Organisation Name
Western States Petroleum Association (WSPA)
InfluenceMap Query
Carbon Tax
Data Source
Media Reports
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-1.09

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

No position on carbon tax

InfluenceMap Comment:

Statement takes no position on carbon tax (Seattle Times, August 2016)

Extract from Source:

So far, the Western States Petroleum Association, which represents refiners, hasn’t taken a position on the carbon-tax initiative or pumped money into an opposition campaign. “We don’t support it and we don’t oppose it,” said Frank Holmes, the association’s regional director.

Created: 29/09/2016 Last edited: 29/09/2016

 

Not supporting carbon tax

InfluenceMap Comment:

Evidence suggests not supporting a carbon tax (Seattle Times, January 2018)

Extract from Source:

Gov. Jay Inslee Tuesday urged Washington lawmakers to embrace his ambitious plan to tax fossil-fuel emissions in Washington state. [...] Inslee’s proposal would levy a $20-a-ton price on carbon emissions, said Reed Schuler, an Inslee policy adviser. That price would rise over time. [...] A spokeswoman for the Western States Petroleum Association — which represents Phillips 66, Shell, Andeavor and U.S. Oil — said the organization is concerned about the tax burden that would be passed along to consumers.

Created: 10/01/2018 Last edited: 10/01/2018

 

Opposing Carbon Tax

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing specific carbon tax in Washington (The Seatle Times, June 2018)

Extract from Source:

Proponents of a Washington carbon-fee initiative showed up at the Secretary of State’s office in Olympia with more than 370,000 signatures to put their measure on the November ballot. […]  A No on 1631 political-action committee formed by the Western States Petroleum Association has obtained pledges from BP, Shell Oil Products, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 and other contributors, according to state Public Disclosure Commission records. [..] The fee would start at $15 a metric ton of carbon, which would add an estimated 14 cents to the cost of a gallon of gasoline. The fee would rise annually by $2 per ton of carbon emission, plus the rate of inflation.

Created: 19/07/2018 Last edited: 19/07/2018