Organisation Name
Western States Petroleum Association (WSPA)
InfluenceMap Query
Climate Science Stance
Data Source
Main Web Site
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-1.0

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Not supporting IPCC need for dramatic action

InfluenceMap Comment:

Not supporting need for immediate GHG emissions reductions (Corporate website, December 2014)

Extract from Source:

They are, of course, wrong on the politics and wrong on the facts. Service station operators and oil companies in the United States are not “causing” global climate to change. Seven billion people who have, or aspire to have, energy-intensive comforts, conveniences and mobility over a century of unprecedented global industrialization are a much more relevant reason why atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing. Let me be clear: Our opposition to pump warning labels is not about denying climate change. Frankly, there isn’t much debate about whether the climate is changing. But there is enormous controversy and debate about how best to address the threat of global warming and how we as a global community are going to share in the cost of transitioning to low-carbon energy without causing economic disruption that will only set these efforts back by years.

Created: 07/10/2015 Last edited: 14/11/2017

 

Not supporting IPCC need for dramatic action

InfluenceMap Comment:

Website stresses costs and impact to industry of California's GHG emission reduction policy (Corporate Website, Mat2017)

Extract from Source:

All six of the WSPA states have developed rules and laws aimed at mitigating climate change, but California’s global warming policies are the most ambitious by far. In 2006, the California State Legislature passed and Governor Schwarzenegger signed AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act.  This law requires that greenhouse gas emissions in California be reduced to 1990 levels by the year 2020 and designated the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to develop a plan to meet this goal.   CARB prepared a blueprint, known as the AB 32 Scoping Plan, laying out various measures necessary to achieve the required reductions.  The resulting regulations and market mechanisms have been adopted. The rules went into effect in January of 2012, and the implementation phase has begun. While the costs of compliance with AB 32 will ultimately be borne by all Californians, the immediate burden falls on energy producers and energy-intensive industries such as electric utilities, oil producers and refiners, agriculture, and manufacturers.

Created: 19/05/2017 Last edited: 16/11/2017