Organisation Name
Western States Petroleum Association (WSPA)
InfluenceMap Query
GHG Emission Standards
Data Source
CEO Messaging
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-1.62

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Not supporting GHG emissions targets

InfluenceMap Comment:

Expressing concern over details of the GHG emissions targets (WSPA President Cathy Reheis-Boyd, Bloomber BNA, July 2016)

Extract from Source:

At a hearing in Sacramento, the California Air Resources Board's governing body gave staff a green light to bring the proposal back for a final vote in early spring 2017. [...] Unveiled earlier this year, the greenhouse gas emissions standards for crude oil and natural gas operators have garnered praised for being stricter than the new federal methane regulations. [...] Oil industry groups like the Western States Petroleum Association are concerned about some elements of the proposal, chiefly how they would be integrated with existing control requirements and the implementation time line. In addition, the rules focus on some “insignificant emissions sources,” WSPA representative Jenifer Pitcher said. WSPA and other groups also said CARB's estimated $22.3 million annual costs of the rules was too low.

Created: 26/07/2016 Last edited: 14/11/2017

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Supporting legal action against the Clean Air Rule in Washington state (WSPA President Cathy Reheis-Boyd, Press Release, September 2016)

Extract from Source:

“WSPA and its member companies are in strong support of the lawsuit against the Washington State Department of Ecology because significant environmental evaluations and policy checkpoints, as required by law, were not adequately developed during the rulemaking of the ‘Clean Air Rule.’ WSPA helped provide the best technical experts from across the nation to participate in the rulemaking process, but the insights of these subject matter experts, who provided dozens of suggestions on how to make the rule balanced and workable, were ignored and the state chose not to use the valuable information that was abundantly offered throughout the process. Furthermore, the manner in which this Rule was put forth circumvents the Legislature and it is clear the Governor went beyond his constitutional authority by creating policy via executive order.”

Created: 14/11/2017 Last edited: 14/11/2017

 

Opposing GHG emissions targets

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing specific GHG emissions targets to reduce emissions 40% below 1990 levels by 2030 (WSPA President Cathy Reheis-Boyd, Are Gov. Brown's new pollution standards realistic?, Press Enterprise, 2016)

Extract from Source:

Western States Petroleum Association President Catherine Reheis-Boyd said the governor and the state legislature “have ushered in the most aggressive greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals in the world.” Reheis-Boyd said the Legislature declined to provide state regulators and stakeholders with a “cost-effective and efficient cap-and-trade program to achieve its stated goals.” Without the proper tools, we remain concerned about the impacts to California energy consumers and our shared economic vitality,” she added.

Created: 29/09/2016 Last edited: 14/11/2017

 

Opposing Low-Carbon Fuel Standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Using California's climate change goals as justification to oppose low-carbon fuel standards (Seattle Times, Catherine Reheis-Boyd, president of the Western States Petroleum Association, Feb 28 2018)

Extract from Source:

“The proposed increased target would further undermine the state’s ability to efficiently meet its climate goals,”

Created: 13/11/2018 Last edited: 13/11/2018

 

Not supporting GHG emissions targets

InfluenceMap Comment:

Evidence suggests not supporting GHG emissions reductions of 40% by 2030 in California (WSPA President Cathy Reheis-Boyd, Natural Gas Intel, March 2017)

Extract from Source:

"When the U.S. Department of Energy looks out to 2040, they say 80% of our energy is still going to be coal, gas and oil," said Reheis-Boyd. California has 38 million people driving 26 million cars, and 92% of all transportation fuel in the state comes from the petroleum industry, she said. "Even if it’s off a bit, that is a pretty large number, and you put that in the context of California's pretty aggressive climate change initiative calling for 40% greenhouse gas emissions reductions by 2030, that's a tough [target].”

Created: 04/04/2017 Last edited: 14/11/2017