Organisation Name
US Chamber of Commerce
InfluenceMap Query
Energy Efficiency Standards
Data Source
Legislative Consultations
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-0.14

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Supporting energy efficiency targerts

InfluenceMap Comment:

Actively supporting energy efficiency policy for housing (US Chamber letter to the Senate and House Energy Conference Committee, September 2016)

Extract from Source:

The undersigned group of manufacturers, builders, and business groups write today to express our support for the Sensible Accounting to Value Energy Act, or SAVE Act, which is included as Subtitle F of S. 2012, the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2016. This provision would improve the energy efficiency of homes by providing a voluntary means of financing energy efficient features and improving the accuracy of mortgage underwriting by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA).

Created: 31/03/2017 Last edited: 31/03/2017

 

Mixed position on energy efficiency standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Suporting energy efficiency standards, although with some exceptions- supporting 'no-cost', no-mandate provisions' (US Chamber letter to the Senate and House Energy Conference Committee, August 2016)

Extract from Source:

We the undersigned businesses and trade associations are writing to express our strong support for the policies included in the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015 (S. 2012) and the North American Energy Security and Infrastructure Act (H.R. 8) that promote energy efficiency in industrial, commercial, and residential applications and urge you to include these provisions in the final conferenced package.We support low to no-cost, no-mandate provisions that advance energy efficiency, while preserving the critical role of government oversight. American taxpayers save money on their energy bills and businesses thrive when we reduce regulatory burdens, increase transparency, and focus on the federal government as a first mover. We believe that marrying the key energy efficiency provisions in S. 2012 and H.R 8 will have a positive impact on the U.S. economy.

Created: 31/03/2017 Last edited: 31/03/2017

 

Not supporting energy efficiency standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing the use of climate change considerations when setting energy efficiency standards (US Chamber, Comment, Request for Information on Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Cost, July 2017)

Extract from Source:

DOE should discontinue the use of the social cost of carbon Perhaps as important as identifying bad regulations that should be modified or repealed is identifying bad regulatory policy that is embedded in agency programs. Once established, bad regulatory policy continues to affect future rule-makings and stacks the deck against the possibility of producing a good regulation by undermining open, transparent, careful, and well informed regulatory processes. DOE’s use of the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) to justify energy efficiency regulations is one such bad regulatory policy.

Created: 02/12/2017 Last edited: 02/01/2018