Organisation Name
US Chamber of Commerce
InfluenceMap Query
GHG Emission Standards
Data Source
Legislative Consultations
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-2.0

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Directly advocating to policy makers to oppose GHG emissions standards. Opposing EPA's Clean Power Plan (Joint statement submitted during the EPA's consultation on 'Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources', December 2014, pp. 4, 23)

Extract from Source:

EPA is proposing this rulemaking as a key component of the President’s Climate Action Plan, which identifies a wide range of actions that the administration is implementing to address the challenges of climate change. In proposing to achieve greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emission reductions from existing electricity generating units (“EGUs”) in the proposed ESPS, however, EPA for the first time in the more than 40 year history of the Clean Air Act (“CAA”) is bootstrapping unprecedented, newfound legal powers onto its existing legal authority without the necessary legislative amendment [...] THE PROPOSED RULE IS ALREADY CAUSING IRREPARABLE HARM AND SHOULD BE WITHDRAWN The aggressive emission reduction targets that EPA has proposed will cause significant and irreparable harm to the Associations’ members. Although the final compliance date is not until 2030, EPA’s proposal would require that the majority of emission reductions occur within a few years, meaning that immediate, rushed action on the part of the Associations’ utility members is necessary to achieve those goals.

Created: 03/06/2015 Last edited: 05/04/2017

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Supporting repeal of specific BLM emission standards on methane (U.S. Chamber Response to Request for Information on Regulations for Reform, letter to Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House of Representatives, May 2017)

Extract from Source:

The order also directs the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to rescind the final rule addressing oil and gas fracking on federal lands and to review the final rule regarding methane venting and flaring. Recommended Action: The Chamber supports the Secretary’s order calling for a review of all DOI mitigation policies, as well as the directives to rescind the final BLM rule on oil and gas fracking on federal lands and to review the final BLM venting and flaring methane rule.

Created: 02/12/2017 Last edited: 02/12/2017

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

The Chamber has voiced support for the Affordable Clean Energy rule, stating that the Clean Power Plan was “unlawful” and would have caused significant economic disruption. (Coalition Letter to Andrew Wheeler, Acting Administrator of the EPA, October 2018)

Extract from Source:

The Associations support the EPA’s proposal to repeal and consider replacing its final rule regulating greenhouse gas emissions (“GHGs”) from existing electric utility generating units (“EGUs”) known as the Clean Power Plan (“CPP”). The CPP transgressed EPA’s statutory authority under the Clean Air Act, as the Agency attempted to aggressively transform the way electricity is produced and dispatched across the United States. The CPP was not only unlawful, but it would have caused significant economic disruption across the American economy. The Associations also maintain that there is a better way to address carbon dioxide emissions under the Clean Air Act, through thoughtful policies that respect the clear limits in existing statutory authority. Thus, the Associations would support a reasonable Rule4 that replaces the Clean Power Plan with emission guidelines limiting CO2 emissions from existing EGUs, as long as those guidelines fall squarely within EPA’s authority under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act.

Created: 25/07/2019 Last edited: 26/07/2019

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing EPA's attempt to finalize vehicle GHG emission standards in their current form (US Chamber, Comments on EPA’s Proposed Determination on the Appropriateness of the Model Year 2022-2025 Light Duty Vehicle GHG Emissions Standards, December 2016)

Extract from Source:

In September of this year, the Chamber filed comments with the EPA, NHTSA and CARB, identifying several problems with the Draft TAR process, including the failure to allow for meaningful stakeholder input, a lack of transparency and completeness on relevant information and data, and poor coordination among the three agencies, particularly with respect to communications with stakeholders. [...] In conclusion and for the reasons described above, the rulemaking process surrounding the Midterm Evaluation, including the Proposed Determination and the Draft TAR, so far has been deficient and inadequate. The EPA should withdraw the Proposed Determination in order to allow for more analysis and stakeholder input on the Draft TAR, and greater coordination among the Agencies on the various steps within the Midterm Evaluation. If the EPA will not withdraw the Proposed Determination, then, at a minimum, it should extend the comment period on the Proposed Determination to 120 days in order to provide stakeholders with a meaningful and sufficient opportunity to submit input.

Created: 03/01/2017 Last edited: 02/01/2018

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Advocating for repeal of EPA methane emission regulations (US Chamber, consultation response, EPA's Request for Comments on Evaluation of Existing Regulations, May 2017)

Extract from Source:

The previous administration worked on regulations for methane emissions from the oil and gas sector. On May 12, 2016, EPA finalized a regulation under the Clean Air Act for reducing methane emissions from new oil and natural gas sources. [...] On April 18, 2017, EPA (under the new Trump administration) announced that it would be reconsidering portions of this rule. [...] Additionally, EPA issued a 90-day stay of the compliance date for the fugitive emissions monitoring requirements in the rule. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency May 9, 2017 Page 12 of 15 In March 2016 the administration announced that it would begin working on a rulemaking for regulating methane emissions from existing oil and natural gas sources. [...] Recommended Action Discontinue the defense of the EPA methane regulations from new oil and gas sources in pending litigation. 17 Proceed with the reconsideration of those regulations per the April 18, 2017, announcement. [...] EPA’s New Source Review (NSR) permitting program is intended to ensure that construction and expansion of factories and power plants does not negatively impact air quality. However, it has long been recognized that the program and its implementation processes often impose unnecessary costs, uncertainties and delays on stakeholders that result in project cancellation [...] Undertake a comprehensive analysis of administrative and legislative options to reduce unnecessary and ineffective New Source Review-related permitting obstacles while still maintaining the program’s environmental benefits.

Created: 02/12/2017 Last edited: 02/12/2017

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

The Chamber is supporting the removal of an EPA rule which tied the construction of new coal plants to the use of carbon capture and sequestration, disputing the EPA’s claim that this had been adequately demonstrated at an industrial scale. (Comments on the Review of Standards of Performance for Greenhouse Gas Emissions From New, Modified, and Reconstructed Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units, February 2019)

Extract from Source:

When originally finalized in 2015, the NSPS exceeded the EPA's authority under the Clean Air Act by imposing requirements on new coal-fired generating units that were neither "adequately demonstrated" nor "commercially available." The 2015 NSPS wrongly concluded that carbon capture and sequestration ("CCS") technology was required for the domestic construction of any new, largescale coal-fired power plant, notwithstanding the fact that no such plant had yet been completed or deemed operational in the country at that time. […] the Chamber believes CCS technology holds great promise to assist us in taking full advantage of America's vast domestic energy resources while addressing the challenge of CO2 emissions and climate change. We have long supported the Department of Energy's efforts to advance this technology along with parallel legislative efforts to improve the economics of CCS. However, the Clean Air Act's NSPS program requires EPA to identify and apply technologies that are already "adequately demonstrated" in practice, on an industrial scale. The standards set forth in EPA's revised NSPS meet that test, whereas the prior mandatory CCS requirement did not. Further, there were many technological, economic, and legal challenges associated with the geologic sequestration of CO2 that were not addressed in EPA's 2015 regulation. The 2015 NSPS rule served as a de facto ban on the construction of new coal plants. The EPA's removal of that unlawful prohibition means that different generation types can again freely compete against each other based upon their merit, rather than an uneven regulatory construct.

Created: 26/07/2019 Last edited: 26/07/2019

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Has issued a 'key issue alert' to members of the US House of Representatives, encouraging poliy makers to oppose the EPA's Clean Power Plan (US Chamber scores US policy makers according to how they vote on 'key issues'. This score relates to how much funding a politician will receive during election season) (US Chamber, 'key issue alert' message to the US House of Representative, July 2016)

Extract from Source:

The Chamber strongly urges you to prohibit implementation of EPA carbon regulations on new and existing power plants, as currently proposed. These proposed rules would pose a significant threat to not only the diversity and reliability of the U.S. electricity system, but would negatively impact nearly every sector of the economy.

Created: 05/04/2017 Last edited: 02/12/2017

 

Opposing GHG emissions standards

InfluenceMap Comment:

Using KEY VOTE ALERT system to directly call for repeal of methane regulation (US Chamber, Global Energy Institute, Key vote alert, February 2017)

Extract from Source:

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce urges you to support H.J. Res. 36, which would undo the Bureau of Land Management’s rule related to methane production. The Chamber will consider including votes on or related to this legislation in our annual How They Voted scorecard. The Chamber applauds Congress for considering legislation to undo the venting and flaring rule from the Bureau of Land Management. Without congressional action, this rule will seriously curtail the American energy renaissance in the oil and gas sector of the past decade. The rule exceeds BLM’s statutory authority, it is duplicative because energy production activities included in this rule are already regulated through state and federal rules, and fails to recognize that the sector has successfully reduced methane emissions voluntarily, even as energy production has grown substantially.

Created: 02/12/2017 Last edited: 02/12/2017