Organisation Name
European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA)
InfluenceMap Query
Energy Policy and Mix
Data Source
CEO Messaging
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-0.66

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Strongly supporting transition of energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Advocating for the EU to implement policies that support the construction of infrastructure required for alternative fuel cars (Euractiv interview with ACEA, Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, June 2015)

Extract from Source:

As manufacturers, we are going to continue investing in alternative fuel cars and electric cars in particular, which only represent 0.5% of the European market at the moment. So incentive schemes need to be upgraded. Second is the infrastructure for electric car recharging, which creates anxiety among consumers about when and where they can recharge their vehicle. A directive was adopted, but targets were taken out. So we need to see this infrastructure put in place. This is why we were so vocal on the Juncker investment plan, to make sure part of it can be used to invest in recharging infrastructure for alternative fuel cars. It can happen on public roads, but also for consumer and office buildings.

Created: 28/07/2015 Last edited: 05/12/2017

 

Opposing transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing measures for the electrification of transport. Opposing EU mandate on electric vehicles (Press Release, September 2017)

Extract from Source:

“Our data demonstrates that, even though it is growing, the European market for ECVs remains extremely patchy, which makes it difficult to envisage anything like an EU-wide mandate or crediting system,” stated ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert.

Created: 17/11/2017 Last edited: 17/11/2017

 

Supporting transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Generally supporting the decarbonisation of transport (Message from ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, November 2016)

Extract from Source:

The automobile industry welcomes the European Commission’s recent initiative to explore how to further decarbonise transport across all modes in Europe, and has already made significant improvements to new vehicle CO2 performance [...] However, we should also take into account market realities. In order to make alternative-fuel vehicles more attractive for consumers we need to create the right ecosystem. This is not just a question of vehicle technology, it is also about providing the necessary infrastructure for convenient charging across the EU and introducing effective incentives to support the uptake of innovative powertrains. Europe’s automobile industry is making significant investments in low-emission technology, but these investments will not be enough if we don’t have a coherent European framework supporting this major transformation.

Created: 17/11/2017 Last edited: 02/02/2018

 

Mixed on measures to transition the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Evidence suggests support for greater infrastructure for electrification of transport, however, also appears not supportive of EU Co2 standards (ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, International Fleet World, July 2018)

Extract from Source:

“Two things are very clear,” said ACEA secretary general, Erik Jonnaert. “Future CO2 reductions depend on greater sales of electric vehicles, and greater sales of electric vehicles depend on a dense network of charging infrastructure. The CO2 legislation must therefore make the link between these two elements.” In response, the ACEA is calling for legislation that includes a mid-term ‘reality check’ to assess the availability of infrastructure and the maturity of the EV market, allowing the targets to be adapted accordingly.

Created: 12/07/2018 Last edited: 12/07/2018

 

Mixed on measures to transition energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Not supporting the push towards electric with Co2 goals, but calling on governments to step up efforts to roll out infrastructure (Bloomberg, February 2019)

Extract from Source:

In a response on Tuesday to the agreement negotiated overnight, the industry group -- known as ACEA -- called the CO2-cut goals “highly demanding” and said EU governments must focus on developing the necessary infrastructure. “We can now only call upon member states to urgently step up their efforts to roll-out the infrastructure required for charging and refuelling the alternatively powered trucks which will need to be sold en masse if these targets are to be met,” ACEA Secretary General Erik Jonnaert said in an emailed statement.

Created: 13/03/2019 Last edited: 13/03/2019

 

Not supporting transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Not supporting EU Commission vision for transition away from oil-fuelled cars by 2050 (Euractiv interview with ACEA, Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, June 2015)

Extract from Source:

(The Commission’s 2011 transport white paper set a vision for cities to become 100% free from oil-fuelled cars by 2050 – meaning mostly electric. Do you think this is achievable?) No, this is unrealistic. This target was set at the time based on the assumption that the market uptake for electric cars would be high. This is mainly due to the higher cost of electric vehicles, which is primarily driven by battery, even if fast progress is being made.

Created: 28/07/2015 Last edited: 05/12/2017

 

Supporting transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Broadly supporting measures to aid the electrification of transportation (ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, Message from Secretary General, September 2016)

Extract from Source:

Promoting greater market uptake of alternative powertrains is therefore key to ensuring further reductions in CO2 emissions. But to do so quickly, industry and policy makers need to work closer together to foster consumer demand. That means that governments across Europe will need to increase their support, both in terms of helping to build the necessary charging infrastructure and in influencing consumer choices, for example by harmonising customer incentives across the EU.

Created: 17/11/2017 Last edited: 17/11/2017

 

Not supporting measures to transition the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Evidence suggests not supporting the electrification of transportation (ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, Euractiv Interview, February 2017)

Extract from Source:

Q. What technologies are currently available to meet the CO2 reduction objective for 2030? What share do you expect will come from things such as light-weighting or electrification, roughly speaking? A.At least half of the reduction will have to come from alternative powertrains, which includes electric, meaning battery electric, plug-in hybrids and fuel cells. Beyond 2020, we know that in order to do more, there is no way you can do it with fuel combustion engines. So we need those electric vehicles to come to the market. But what if people don’t buy them? We can’t push them down peoples’ throats. That’s why we urge policymakers to look at factors influencing the behaviour of consumers, the first of which is price. Currently, electric vehicles are sold at a premium because of the cost of the batteries. Q.Battery costs are coming down fast, however. A. It’s going down, yes. On average, manufacturers estimate that between 2020 and 2022, prices will have come down enough for electric cars to be sold at par with conventional vehicles. Q. 2022 is very soon… A. Exactly. So then why have a review of the CO2 target already in 2025? We need to see first how the market evolves. Setting targets for 2025 now seems a bit too early. [...] Q. Not so long ago, ACEA was arguing in favour of “a comprehensive approach” to CO2 reduction, saying all technologies were needed to get there. But the push for electric vehicles seems to have invalidated this. Has ACEA dropped its “technology neutral” stance? A. I don’t agree. Yes, we’re going into a new era where electro-mobility is becoming increasingly important. But frankly, the jury is still out whether it will be a success because the market hasn’t picked up. We know we need to do more in this area and we are moving towards a menu of options where electro-mobility is one of them. I know some people out there want 100% electrification but we don’t believe in that. [...] Next to electric, we think there is still an opportunity for gas. It doesn’t lead to the same results but it’s still a promising approach to reduce CO2, not just for heavy-duty vehicles but in general. And diesel will still be part of the mix, first as a transition technology, especially the cleanest engines complying with Euro 6d standards. With new testing methods applicable since September, we hear that they are now close to zero-emission, like electric.

Created: 02/02/2018 Last edited: 02/02/2018

 

Opposing measures to transition energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing specific measures for electrification of transport (ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, October 2018)

Extract from Source:

“We remain particularly concerned about the extremely aggressive CO2 reduction targets and the imposition of sales quotas for battery electric vehicles that MEPs have backed. Today’s vote risks having a very negative impact on jobs across the automotive value chain,” stated ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert. “It would essentially force the industry into a dramatic transformation in record time.” “Consumers cannot be forced to buy electric cars, without the necessary infrastructure or incentives in place,” Erik Jonnaert explained. Jonnaert: “We can only hope that national governments bring some realism to the table when adopting their common position on the future CO2 targets next week.”

Created: 05/10/2018 Last edited: 05/10/2018

 

Mixed on transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Supporting some measures to aid electrification of transport, although not supporting ambition in others, in particular CO2 targes (ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, Press Release, November 2017)

Extract from Source:

Erik Jonnaert: “Europe needs much more investment in recharging and refuelling infrastructure, before we can expect consumers throughout the entire EU to embrace such vehicles.” ACEA therefore welcomes the Commission’s action plan for boosting investment in a network of charging and refuelling stations across the European Union.  Infrastructure, however, is only one side of the coin. Affordability clearly also is a major barrier for many Europeans, underlining the need for harmonised and coherent consumer incentives. “A radical change in the market for alternatively-powered vehicles will of course not happen overnight. This is why focusing on a 2030 target is the best way forward. Instead of setting an interim target in 2025,

Created: 17/11/2017 Last edited: 17/11/2017

 

Mixed on transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Supporting measures towards the electrification of transport but with some exceptions. Calling for 'technolgy neutral' approach to emission reductions  (ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, press release, July 2017)

Extract from Source:

“The automobile industry is fully committed to continue reducing CO2 emissions across all business segments, from passenger cars to trucks,” stated ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert. However, as this strategy puts all the emphasis on road transport, ACEA calls for a more balanced approach, addressing all modes of transport – including air, maritime and rail. Technology neutrality is key to supporting innovation and thus greater fuel-efficiency, so ACEA welcomes the fact that this principle is enshrined in today’s communication. “All vehicle manufacturers will continue investing in both internal combustion engines as well as the full range of alternative powertrains that meet the demands of both private and business customers,” stated Jonnaert. “As the Communication rightly points out however, a wider roll-out of infrastructure for alternative fuel vehicles is needed to enable a stronger market uptake of zero- or low-emissions vehicles by 2030.”

Created: 17/11/2017 Last edited: 17/11/2017

 

Not supporting measures to transition the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Evidence suggests not supporting the electrification of transportation (ACEA President, Carlos Tavares, Euractiv, February 2018)

Extract from Source:

However, a lack of charging infrastructure means Europe is nowhere near ready to solve the problem through a widespread uptake of electric vehicles, Tavares told reporters in Brussels. According to the ACEA president, the European Commission’s recent proposal to cut CO2 emissions limits by 30% between 2021 and 2030 went well beyond what was agreed under the EU’s climate and energy framework to meet Europe’s commitments under the Paris Agreement on climate change. “It puts the global competitiveness of the European auto industry at risk,” Tavares warned, saying the automotive sector was “still trying to understand the rationale” behind the European Commission’s ‘clean mobility package’. Moreover, the interim 2025 target of a 15% reduction did not give the car industry time to make the necessary technical changes. Reaching any future CO2 target will strongly depend on much higher sales of alternatively powered vehicles, Tavares said. “We believe the current CO2 proposal is not fully technology neutral…and effectively pushes for pure battery electric vehicles,” he argued. [...] The ACEA president repeatedly returned to the issue of consumer choice, saying a lack of infrastructure meant carmakers had no confidence in finding a market for electric vehicles, even if they were to manufacture them in significant numbers. “Either we don’t sell those vehicles, we don’t meet the CO2 objectives, and we have huge penalties which puts our companies in stress. Or we need to push those vehicles into the market with a significant level of incentives, which means margins become thin or negative, and this means our companies need to restructure,” Tavares said, making repeated references to the 12.6 million jobs in the EU that depend directly or indirectly on car manufacturing. The ball, Tavares said, is now in the court of EU and national lawmakers, who need to convince consumers by investing up front in “the right level of charging network density”.

Created: 02/02/2018 Last edited: 02/02/2018

 

Opposing measures to transition energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing specific measures for electrification of transport (ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert, October 2018)

Extract from Source:

“Our industry is committed to making the shift to zero-emission vehicles. But this transition should be assured in a gradual, rather than an abrupt way,” explained ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert. […] “The more aggressive the CO2 reduction targets are, the more disruptive the socio-economic impacts will be, especially in member states and regions where the sector’s share of industrial output is high,” […] “The stakes of Wednesday’s vote are extremely high for the entire sector, which accounts for over 6% of the EU employed population and 27% of all private EU investment in research and development,” cautioned Jonnaert.  “We are calling on MEPs to be aware of the possible unintended implications of their vote. Reducing CO2 emissions from the transport sector is of course crucial – as is affordable mobility for consumers and the long-term viability of the European automotive sector.”

Created: 05/10/2018 Last edited: 05/10/2018