Organisation Name
European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA)
InfluenceMap Query
Energy Policy and Mix
Data Source
Main Web Site
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-0.39

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Not supporting transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Advocating for policy makers not to favor specific technologies to respond to environmental concerns, which may be necessary to transition the energy mix. (Consultation briefing: 'Towards a more sustainable transport policy', International Transport Forum's summit, 2014)

Extract from Source:

Technology-neutral policies Setting technology-related targets, with regards to city access for example, has to be avoided. It is a general practice that policy makers avoid prematurely picking technology ‘winners’. Transport policy strategies must adhere to this principle accordingly. A technology-neutral policy approach reinforces the potential for overall technological progress, which is in the interests of society and the competitiveness of the economy.

Created: 17/07/2015 Last edited: 17/11/2017

 

Generally supporting measures to transition the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Advocating for policy makers to implement policy that supports the development of new low-emission technologies such as the electric cars. (Website 2015)

Extract from Source:

National governments need to provide appropriate and predictable technology-neutral market incentives and subsidies, particularly during the introduction phase of this new technology. New technologies generally come in low volume and at significant cost premiums first, which needs to be off-set by a positive policy framework. Around a dozen national governments of EU Member states have introduced incentives for the purchase of electric vehicles[1]. The measures mainly consist of tax reductions and exemptions, as well as bonus payments for the buyers of electric vehicles. National authorities are increasingly taking CO2 and other emissions into account in car taxation. Fiscal measures are an important tool in shaping consumer demand towards fuel efficient cars, notably when it comes to infant technologies. The environmental results of such tax incentives may, however, be negatively influenced by the widely varying systems in each country. The industry strongly urges EU governments to harmonise electric car incentive and taxation schemes. The industry is in favour of a CO2 taxation scheme, which is technology neutral, and taxes cars based on their well-to-pump emissions footprint. Governments should also ensure stable regulatory framework and support of education, research, development and innovation.

Created: 17/07/2015 Last edited: 17/11/2017

 

Opposing measures to transition energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing ambition on measures to drive electrification of transport (ACEA, Press Release, September 2018)

Extract from Source:

A recent report by FTI Consulting reveals that the European Commission underestimates the impact of a forced push for electric cars on EU employment. [...] Jonnaert: “This report makes it clear that overly stringent CO2 targets, as well as unrealistic sales quota for battery electric vehicles (the so-called ‘benchmarks’), could lead to serious structural problems across the EU.

Created: 05/10/2018 Last edited: 17/04/2019

 

Generally supporting transition of energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Supporting policies necessary to build the infrastructure for the transition of the fuels used in transportation (Website 2015)

Extract from Source:

ACEA’s members will continue to invest in alternative powertrains, including electric, hybrid, fuel-cell and natural gas-powered vehicles. Therefore ACEA welcomes the call for the swift deployment of alternative fuel re-charging infrastructure – essential for the roll-out of these alternative vehicles. ACEA also calls for the harmonisation of customer incentives across EU member states to support the market uptake of such vehicles.

Created: 17/07/2015 Last edited: 05/12/2017

 

Opposing measures to transition the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Opposing mandate for zero or low emissions vehicles (ACEA, position paper on vehicle CO2 targets in Europe, September 2017)

Extract from Source:

Bearing in mind the diversity of markets within the EU, their geographical situation and climate conditions, as well as the uncertainty surrounding infrastructure investments for alternatively-powered vehicles and consumer acceptance of such powertrains, no form of mandate for zero-emission vehicles (ZEV) or low-emission vehicles (LEV) should be implemented.

Created: 17/11/2017 Last edited: 17/11/2017

 

Mixed position on measures to transition energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Supporting LEV, ZEV incentives but with some exceptions (ACEA, Position Paper, CO2 standards for heavy-duty vehicle, August 2018)

Extract from Source:

The European Commission proposal includes an incentive system for low-and zero-emission heavy-duty vehicles (also known as LEVs and ZEVs) in order to support their market uptake. Simply put, whenselling a LEV or ZEV,a manufacturer will be granted so-called ‘super credits’that count multiple times towards achieving the manufacturer-specificCO2 target. [...] Under the Commission’s current proposal, a vehicle is considered to be a LEV if it emits less than 350g CO2/km. A ZEV is defined as a vehicle emitting less than 1g CO2/km, which in today’s context means that it has to be either a full-electric vehicle or a hydrogen one. LEVs will count as up to two vehicles, while ZEVs will be counted as two vehicles[...] .What does ACEA propose? The European truck industry welcomes the Commission’s proposal for a ZEV/LEV incentive system in the form of supercredits. [..] However, ACEA believes that the system will only be effective after making the following changes: •The definition of LEVs should be improved by using the VECTO metric ofg CO2/tkm, instead of g CO2/kmas proposed by the Commission. [...] .While bigger vehicles might emit more in absolute terms (ie in g CO2/km), they are more efficientthan smaller onesas they simply transport more goods. In other words, less trucks are needed for the same work. Hence, defining the LEVt hreshold in g CO2/km is a mistake as it would favour the deployment of smaller trucks. [...] super credits should apply to all vehicles emitting at least 35% less CO2 than the reference value of the vehicle sub-group concerned(derived from a 2019 baseline).

Created: 05/10/2018 Last edited: 17/04/2019

 

Generally supporting transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Advocating for policy makers to support the development of bio-fuels for use in transportation (ACEA position paper, Website 2015)

Extract from Source:

On the basis of this proposal, the co-legislators must now define a clear pathway for stable EU policy to help make the rapid transition to cleaner, sustainable and high quality biofuels to significantly improve environmental and climate change impacts as well as societal acceptance in a truly integrated approach. As noted above, what is highly important for the auto-industry is that these sustainable biofuels must be developed, at the earliest possible stage, as quality fuels fulfilling robust standards for current and future engine technology needs.

Created: 17/07/2015 Last edited: 17/04/2019

 

Mixed on transition of the energy mix

InfluenceMap Comment:

Supporting specific measures to aid electrification of transport - EV incentives (e.g. tax reductions and exemptions). However, also calling for policy supporting continued role for conventional vehicles (ACEA, Overview of incentives for buying electric vehicles, May 2017)

Extract from Source:

Incentives for electrically-chargeable vehicles are now applied in many European countries. The incentives mainly consist of tax reductions and exemptions, as in countries such as Austria or Germany, and bonus payments and premiums for the buyers of electric vehicles in France and the UK. The European car industry supports the further introduction of fiscal incentives for fuel efficiency. Tax measures are an important tool in shaping consumer demand towards fuel-efficient cars and help create a market for breakthrough technologies, notably during the introduction phase.[...]Electric mobility will make an important contribution towards ensuring sustainable mobility. However, advanced conventional technologies, engines and fuels will play a predominant role for years to come. Governments must continue to include these CO2-efficient technologies and solutions in their overall sustainable mobility policy approach.

Created: 17/11/2017 Last edited: 17/11/2017