Organisation Name
BusinessEurope
InfluenceMap Query
Renewable Energy Legislation
Data Source
Legislative Consultations
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-1.47

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Opposing renewable energy legislation

InfluenceMap Comment:

Directly advocating to policy makers to oppose renewable energy legislation. Opposing EU 2030 renewable energy target (BusinessEurope submission to EU consultation on 2030 framework for energy and climate policies, June 2013, p 11 paragraph 7)

Extract from Source:

Policy recommendation 2: Set a 2030 emissions reduction target Substitute multiple targets for emissions reduction, renewable and energy efficiency with a single emissions reduction target. A single EU emissions reduction target for 2030 should be the main driver to incentivise the transition towards a more sustainable economy in Europe. Setting a target to 2030 would give the needed medium- to long-term perspective to business and investors and increase the predictability of the regulatory framework. Due to their overlapping scope with the EU ETS, the EU targets for energy efficiency and renewable energy sources should not be continued after 2020.

Created: 29/07/2015 Last edited: 01/03/2019

 

Opposing renewable energy legislation

InfluenceMap Comment:

Advocating for focus on a single GHG target, instead of multiple targets for renewable energy and energy efficiency and calling for the phasing out of renewable energy subsidies (BUSINESSEUROPE,  response to the public consultation on a new energy market design, October 2015)

Extract from Source:

The EU should focus on a single greenhouse gas emissions reduction target to incentivise investments in low-carbon and energy-efficient technologies. Support schemes for renewables should be progressively phased out to allow the market to determine energy choices [...] EU Member states are using electricity bills as a mean to fund energy policy costs, including renewable energysubsidies and efficiency policy. Electricity bills are therefore no longer driven primarily by the cost to generate and transport the electricity –but instead by taxes and levies which are added on top. As long as EU Member states deliberately increase the price of electricity, electrification will remain an uneconomic option for investors and competition [...] Renewable and low carbon technologies offer interesting market perspectives for many European companies. However the energy price impact of current support schemes is not viable for the EU‟s economy. The barrier to renewable energy is cost. Until renewables are cost effective (inclusive all additional imbalance costs and grid investments) industries competing globally have to be fully exempted for all direct and indirect related renewable energy support cost. Support for the market deployment of renewable should be progressively phased out to allow the market to determine energy choices. In the long run low carbon investments should be driven by the carbon price, which is the most efficient signal -being conditional towards carbon and investment leakage protection..[...] On the short to medium-term, and as a transitional phase, subsidies for those renewable energy technologies shall be based on mechanisms that try to avoid negative effects on the market. Such a transitional renewable support scheme should be coordinated EU wide, allowing for the most cost-effective deployment of varying renewable energy technologies across Europe. Any renewable support scheme must allow for full exemption towards any additional costs for energy intensive industry sectors that face international competition.EU state aid rules should reflect this as well

Created: 09/01/2017 Last edited: 09/01/2017

 

Opposing renewable energy legislation

InfluenceMap Comment:

Directly advocating to policy makers to oppose renewable energy legislation and renewable energy subsidies (BusinessEurope submission to EU consultation on 2030 framework for energy and climate policies, June 2013, pp 13-14)

Extract from Source:

Policy recommendation 4: Phase out support for the market deployment of energy produced from renewable sources [...] At the same time it must be acknowledged that energy prices have risen significantly due to renewable energy promotion. Support schemes have to be radically reviewed to avoid market distortions and especially to lower the cost burdens for European industry and the European economy as a whole. A more market-oriented approach based on a well functioning internal energy market is the right way forward to achieve a more balanced and cost efficient renewable policy. Therefore, support for the market deployment of renewable energy production should be progressively phased out [...] A streamlining and coordination of Member States’ support schemes will be essential in the transitional phase. The following core principles should apply: • Support schemes should, as a matter of principle, be technology-neutral. Technology-specific support might still be needed for less mature technologies but support schemes should follow strict cost efficiency requirements and an upper threshold of support volumes should be clearly defined. • Member States should consider cost-efficient and more market-oriented renewable support, including increased participation in wholesale markets and a requirement to be responsible for imbalance costs. • Priority grid access for renewable energy should be phased out.

Created: 29/07/2015 Last edited: 21/06/2016

 

Not supporting renewable energy legislation

InfluenceMap Comment:

Accepting agreed EU renewable energy targets, but appearing to oppose the possibility of more ambitious targets in Europe in light of UN Climate Deal  (BusinessEurope, Director, Markus. J Breyrer, letters to Chair of the EU Environment Council and the Commissioner for Climate Action and Energy, 'BUSINESSEUROPE views on the impact of the Paris agreement on the 2030 framework for climate and energy policies' February 2016)

Extract from Source:

While other major economies have indicated their intention to accelerate efforts to reduce emissions, the EU is by far the most ambitious even among the developed countries. [...] Against this background, the priority for the EU must be to adopt, as quickly as possible, a legislative framework for post-2020, in line with the October 2014 European Council conclusions, i.e. 40% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions as a binding target and 27% share of renewable energy and 27% improvement of energy efficiency as indicative targets. Therefore, we call on you to refrain from re-opening the political debate on those targets, which represent the most ambitious climate action efforts across the planet. This is crucial to avoid undermining long-term investment security for European industries.

Created: 21/06/2016 Last edited: 04/06/2018