Organisation Name
American Petroleum Institute (API)
InfluenceMap Query
Renewable Energy Legislation
Data Source
Legislative Consultations
 
 

Score for this Data / Query Cell

-1.12

InfluenceMap has researched and collated the following pieces of evidence associated with the data source and query indicated above. Extraordinary information is indicated by a coloured flag in the upper right corner. Evidence items in order of data inputted with exceptional items first.

 

Opposing renewable energy legislation

InfluenceMap Comment:

Not supporting renewable energy targets within Clean Power Plan (Evidence from joint statement submitted during the EPA's consultation on 'Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units, December 2014)

Extract from Source:

Renewable energy has great promise in Montana and neighboring states, but the ability to construct new wind energy parks is limited by the constraints of the transmission system to send the energy to more populous areas where demand is concentrated, and by the ability of the rest of the generating fleet and the grid to reliably integrate weather-dependent renewable energy which may or may not be generated as needed. These are not intractable problems, but it is clear that the EPA rule has not thoroughly considered them—certainly not on the state-to-state basis that is necessary for the BSER to be adequately demonstrated. As a preliminary matter, the EPA rule is vague and even self-contradicting on the question of which state should get credit for renewables. Should it be the state where the renewable generator is located, or another state where consumers of the energy might reside?

Created: 03/06/2015 Last edited: 29/11/2017

 

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InfluenceMap Comment:

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Extract from Source:

API continues to believe that the RFS should sunset in its entirety by the end of 2022. Mandates and subsidies distort the free market and ultimately increase costs to consumers. For more than a decadealready, the RFS program has mandated the use of biofuels,and fuel suppliershaveresponded by building out the necessary infrastructure to blend ethanolandbiodiesel into our nation’s fuel supply.[...] API opposeslegislation that would establish a 15 billion gallon per year mandate for corn ethanol. It is not feasible for our domestic gasoline market to consume 15 billion gallons of ethanol in 2019due to limitations with the existing vehicle fleet. It would also be infeasible and prohibitively expensive to modify the thousands of retail stations that would require new E15 compatible storage and dispensing systems. [...] Webelieve that the RFS program is outdated and broken, and we support bipartisan efforts in Congress to sunset the program.

Created: 16/01/2019 Last edited: 16/01/2019

 

Not supporting renewable energy legislation

InfluenceMap Comment:

Directly advocating to policymakers to support weaker renewable fuel standards (API Comments on 2018 RFS Proposal, August 2017)

Extract from Source:

AFPM and API appreciate EPA’s continuing recognition of the real-world constraints, including anticipated costs that affect the RFS program.8 For 2018, EPA has relied on its cellulosic waiver authority9 to propose reductions in statutory volumes for total renewable fuel, advanced biofuels, and cellulosic biodiesel, but they are not enough. EPA must consider all effects of the E10 blendwall and other constraints and conditions that limit the use of ethanol and other renewable fuel, such as BBD, in transportation fuel. This recognition is key to understanding the real-world limitations on renewable fuel mandates in 2018 and future compliance years. We also support EPA’s proposal to maintain the full amount of RINs that have been reserved, or “banked,” for future use. Clean Air Act (“CAA”) §211(o)(5), which provides for the generation of renewable fuel credits, requires this action. In addition, maintaining a sufficient RIN bank will help mitigate some of the costs imposed by the RFS program, improve flexibility in compliance, and improve the functionality of the RIN marketplace. AFPM and API support EPA’s reduction of the required volumes of renewable fuel in recognition of the real-world constraints on their consumption. We also support EPA’s decision to maintain a sufficient level of “banked RINs” to ensure compliance flexibility and a functioning RIN market. The Agency, however, should further revise the required volumes downward

Created: 29/11/2017 Last edited: 29/11/2017

 

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InfluenceMap Comment:

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Extract from Source:

API’s primary concern with the RFS is the ethanol blendwall. The majority of light-duty vehicles on the road today were not designed and warranted for ethanol blends above 10%, and there remain serious vehicle and infrastructure compatibility issues with blends above 10%. [...] The statutory volumes set in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 are unattainable and maintaining these mandated levels could result in fuel supply disruptions that harm our economy. Congress provided EPA with waiver authority that should be used to reduce the RFS volumes and avoid the potential negative impacts on America’s fuel supply and prevent harm to American consumers. [...] API continues to urge EPA to exercise its general waiver authority to reduce the volume requirements based on the severe economic harm rationale as we have articulated in detail to EPA, most recently in comments to the 2018 RVO rulemaking [...] API believes that the RFS program is outdated and broken, and we support bipartisan efforts in Congress to repeal or significantly reform the program.

Created: 16/01/2019 Last edited: 16/01/2019

 

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InfluenceMap Comment:

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Extract from Source:

Our members’ primary RFS concern is the ethanol blendwall. The increases in gasoline demand projected at the inception of the RFS2 in 2007 did not materialize, nor did the commercialization of cellulosic biofuels [...] The RFS is a burden on all refiners, regardless of size, that ultimately impacts consumers. The small refinery exemptions granted by EPA create an unlevel playing field for competing refiners in the marketplace. [...] All of the proposed 590 million gallon increase in the 2019 standard is in the Advanced Biofuel category, and it amounts to a 14% increase from 2018. Biodiesel, which has its own 2.1 billion gallon mandate, is expected to fill the gap intended for other Advanced biofuels, and the gap in the general renewable category where ethanol is limited by the E10 blendwall. Altogether, EPA is proposing a very aggressive Advanced Biofuel mandate that ultimately relies on increased biodiesel imports and carryover RINs to be met [...] We therefore urge EPA to lower the Advanced standard, and similarly, to not increase 2020 Biomass-based Diesel standard. [...] In closing, the proposed volumes are an annual example of a broken government program. We continue to believe the best solution to fix the RFS is comprehensive legislation that includes a sunset of the program in 2022. API continues to work with bipartisan leaders in Congress to come up with a comprehensive approach to fixing the outdated and broken ethanol mandate..

Created: 16/01/2019 Last edited: 16/01/2019