Volvo Group

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
55%
Organisation Score
40%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Gothenburg, Sweden
Brands and Associated Companies
Volvo, Renault Trucks, Mack, Nova Bus

Volvo group appears to have a mixed and at times contradictory engagement with climate policy.

The company is supporting the Paris Agreement, signing the ‘We are still in Pledge’ in the US in 2017 and in April 2020 suggested that it “shared the Green Deal vision of sustainable transport and a carbon neutral Europe by 2050”

In 2018, Volvo Group appears to have advocated to the Swedish Government that the EU Commission proposed CO2 targets for heavy duty vehicles are “far too ambitious”, instead suggesting weaker targets with smaller penalties. Despite this, Volvo’s 2019 Sustainability Report (released in 2020) states that EU efforts to regulate CO2 emissions from heavy duty vehicles proceeded with “broad support from the Volvo Group.” The company characterises the position of the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), of which Volvo Group is a member, in the same way, despite the fact that ACEA was highly oppositional to these standards, arguing that they were far too aggressive and advocating that cuts to emissions “should happen at a pace that is realistic.”

Volvo Group’s sustainability report also does not disclose it’s support for rollbacks to US Federal CAFE standards, outlined in a letter sent to President Donald Trump in June 2019. Volvo Group also opposed California’s Advanced Clean Trucks Regulation, arguing that sales mandates were inappropriate and for greater flexibility in the regulation in December 2019 and May 2020. Despite this, Volvo Group has opposed a loophole in US fuel economy standards for trucks and has supported certain vehicle replacement schemes and incentives to encourage greater uptake of vehicles that produce fewer emissions.

Volvo Group provides no disclosure of it’s trade association memberships, stating instead that said disclosure is “available on request.” Volvo Group retains memberships to a number of trade associations that are actively opposed to ambitious climate policy. For example, Volvo Group CEO Martin Lundstedt is on the board of ACEA, which has actively opposed proposed heavy-duty vehicle standards in Europe between 2016-2020. Volvo Group Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg is chair of the European Roundtable of Industrialists which has been also been oppositional to climate ambition in Europe in the past but appears in 2019-2020 to be evolving this position. Further to this, Volvo Group is a member of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), which has opposed US climate policy leadership, including actively opposing various strands of climate regulation in the country.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
2 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
NS 0 NA NS 0 NS NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation
0 NS NS NS 2 NS NS NA
UN Treaty Support
NS 1 NS NS 0 NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
-1 NA -2 NA NA NA NS NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
0 0 NS 0 NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
NS 0 NS 0 0 1 NS NA
GHG Emission Standards
NS 0 NS 0 0 NS NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS -2 NA NA NA NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
46%
 
46%
 
40%
 
40%
 
23%
 
23%
 
39%
 
39%
 
51%
 
51%
 
36%
 
36%
 
43%
 
43%
 
43%
 
43%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.