Toyota Motor

InfluenceMap Score
E+
Performance Band
39%
Organisation Score
36%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Toyota City, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies
Hino Motors , Daihatsu Motor, Toyota Financial Services
Wikipedia:

Toyota is actively and negatively engaged on a wide variety of climate policies.

While Toyota has released pro-climate advertising campaigns, has made top-line statements in support for the Paris Agreement, limiting global warming to 2°C, and setting a national decarbonization goal, the company does not appear to be supporting a range of climate policy and regulation directly related to the automotive sector.

In 2018, Toyota appears to have supported the US Administration's efforts to roll back on US CAFE and GHG emission vehicle standards, having called on US President to re-evaluate the rules in 2017, as well as appearing to advocate directly to policymakers for their stringency to be weakened. In 2019, Toyota further supported the Administration’s rollback efforts, intervening in a legal case to support the removal of California's ability to set it's own standards under it's Clean Air Act waiver.

Despite promoting hydrogen fuel cell, hybrid vehicle technology and electrification of transport, in 2017-18 Toyota has opposed measures to phase out of conventional vehicles in India and the UK, whilst also appearing unsupportive of zero emission vehicle (ZEV) mandates in China and the EU.

Toyota was a member of the committee consulting on Japan's Long-term Strategy under the Paris Agreement, together with Keidanren and Japan Steal, where it has been reported they pushed for the watering-down of commitments to abolish coal power plants but settling on "reduced independence" on coal. In 2019, Toyota opposed the implementation of carbon tax in a published interview.

In general, Toyota is highly opaque in terms of its public policy positions, and currently provides no centralised disclosure on its climate policy positions, instead opting to focus on the operational targets contained within it’s Toyota Environmental Challenge 2050 initiative.

Toyota also maintains memberships to a range of automotive trade groups that have continued to actively oppose the development of ambitious climate policy for the sector globally in 2018, including the Japanese Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA), the US Auto Alliance and the European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA).

A senior Toyota executive is also vice-chairman of the powerful cross-sector trade group Keidanren, which has actively opposed policies proposed to help Japan reach the emission reductions indicated by the Paris Agreement whilst promoting a coal-based energy future for Japan.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
1 2 NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
0 NS NA 1 0 2 0 NA
Need for Climate Regulation
NS NS NS 1 -1 NS NS NA
UN Treaty Support
1 1 NA NS NS NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
-2 NA -2 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS -1 NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
NS -1 NS 0 -1 NS 0 NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
0 1 NS 0 -1 -1 NS NA
GHG Emission Standards
NS -1 NS 0 -1 NS 0 NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-2 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
60%
 
60%
 
25%
 
25%
 
36%
 
36%
 
39%
 
39%
 
36%
 
36%
 
39%
 
39%
 
23%
 
23%
 
22%
 
22%
 
38%
 
38%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.