ThyssenKrupp AG

InfluenceMap Score
D-
Performance Band
43%
Organisation Score
41%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Buisburg and Essen, Germany

ThyssenKrupp appears to advocate against the ambition of most strands of climate change policy. It stated in 2015 that it is in favor of an international agreement on climate change, with its board willing to support an agreement to reduce emissions in line with 2C temperature change. It is however, in lieu of such a global regulatory framework, against EU unilateral action on climate change, which it stated in 2016 could lead to the deindustrialization of Europe, partly as it believes steel production is already at the physical limit of carbon reduction. Consistent with this, it opposes the ambition of the European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), in particular the Linear Reduction Factor reform, the Market Stability Reserve and any further correction factors, whilst advocating for more free emissions permits. It expresses similar concerns about the German Renewables Energies Act, declaring in consultation in 2015 that it is an inefficient policy, elsewhere stating it is irresponsibly putting 5000 of its company's jobs at risk. ThyssenKrupp does appear to be supportive of the transition of the energy mix to include more renewable energy, in particular advocating for technological processes to reuse carbon emissions, which it believes could circumvent the need to reduce carbon intensive industrial feedstocks. It is a member of several trade associations, with its CEO Heinrich Hiesinger being on the board of board of Eurofer, which appears to hold the same positions on climate change policy.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
1 1 NA 0 1 NS NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation
0 1 NA -1 1 -1 -1 NA
UN Treaty Support
1 NS NA 1 NS NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS -1 NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
-1 NS -1 -2 -1 -1 -1 NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
NS NS -1 NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
NS NS -1 NS -2 1 NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
0 1 2 1 0 0 NS NA
GHG Emission Standards
NS NS NS 1 NS 0 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
43%
 
43%
 
46%
 
46%
 
48%
 
48%
 
33%
 
33%
 
29%
 
29%
 
33%
 
33%
 
51%
 
51%
 
35%
 
35%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.