Siemens

InfluenceMap Score
C+
Performance Band
87%
Organisation Score
52%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Industrials
Head​quarters:
Berlin, Germany
Brands and Associated Companies
Siemens Energy, Siemens Gamesa, Nokia Siemens Networks
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Siemens and its subsidiaries, Siemens Energy and Siemens Gamesa, appear to have engaged positively on climate change policy in Germany, Europe, and the US. In particular, Siemens has actively lobbied for greater ambition on EU policies across numerous policy areas including GHG targets, energy efficiency, and renewable energy.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Siemens appears to have positive top-line messaging on climate policy. In 2020, Siemens supported a 2050 climate neutrality target in both the UK and the EU, with its subsidiary, Siemens Gamesa, also stating support for a 1.5°C global warming target in 2019. In a 2020 consultation response, Siemens Energy urged EU policymakers to support “quotas, targets and refinancing mechanisms” and a “polluter pays principle” in climate policy as it “would be wrong to assume that the ETS alone can decarbonize all sectors”. Siemens has also stated support for the Paris Agreement in 2020, and supported the US re-joining the agreement in 2021.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Siemens appears to have had positive engagement with EU climate policy in 2018-20. In 2020, Siemens Gamesa stated support for a higher 2030 EU GHG emissions target of 55%. Furthermore, in multiple consultations, Siemens Energy advocated to EU policymakers to introduce legislation to phase out SF6 greenhouse gas in the electricity sector in 2020.

Regarding the EU ETS, in a 2020 consultation response Siemens Energy argued that EU ETS “prices must be higher and more sectors need to be covered by the EU ETS”. However, in the same response, the company appeared to emphasize carbon leakage concerns to support the continued allocation of free allowances alongside introducing a Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism. In 2018, Siemens Gamesa also signed a joint letter supporting EU ETS reforms, including a European carbon price floor to increase the carbon price and effectiveness of the scheme.

In 2020, Siemens signed a joint letter urging California to support ambitious energy efficiency standards to decarbonize buildings, and in 2018 advocated for a higher 40% EU energy efficiency target for 2030. Siemens Gamesa in 2019 signed a joint industry letter urging the UK government to introduce policies to promote increased onshore wind construction. Furthermore, a 2020 EU consultation response from Siemens Energy suggests support for a more ambitious 2030 EU renewable energy target.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Siemens appears to have mixed engagement on the energy transition, supporting measures to decarbonize the power and other sectors while lobbying to promote the role of natural gas in the EU. In 2020, Siemens Energy advocated for legislation to promote offshore renewables in the European energy mix in a consultation response. Siemens Gamesa in 2020 also actively promoted the proliferation of green hydrogen for hard-to-decarbonize sectors like heavy industry, aviation, and shipping. Siemens in 2020 also appears to support regulatory measures to electrify transportation and decarbonize buildings in the US. However, communications from Siemens in 2019-21 have also consistently supported a role for natural gas in the energy mix, including as an “interim solution for our global energy system for years to come”. In 2020, Siemens lobbied an EU Commissioner in a private minute for a weaker threshold for gas-fired generational in the EU's Sustainable Finance Taxonomy, both for the "significant contribution" and "do no significant harm" thresholds. Furthermore, in 2020 Siemens Energy CEO, Christian Bruch, appeared to promote a continued role for coal in the energy mix without CCS.

Industry Association Governance: Siemens has publicly disclosed information on its memberships to industry associations on a dedicated webpage, without providing further details on the company’s role within each association or its influence over their climate positions. Siemens has not published a review of its alignment with its industry associations. Siemens retains membership to an extensive list of industry associations with conflicting climate change agendas across numerous regions. This includes the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, European Roundtable for Industry and BusinessEurope which are negatively lobbying on climate policy, and those such as WindEurope and American Wind Energy Association which are positively on lobbying climate policy.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Communication of Climate Science
2 1 NS NS NS NS NS NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 1 NA 1 2 1 NS NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
1 2 NS 2 NS NS NS NA
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NA 1 1 1 NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
1 NA 2 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
1 NS NS 2 2 NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
1 2 2 0 2 NS NS NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
2 1 1 NS 2 NS NS NA
Renewable Energy
1 1 1 2 2 NS NS NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
0 1 1 0 0 0 NS NA
GHG Emission Regulation
2 2 2 2 2 NS NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS 1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
46%
 
46%
 
64%
 
64%
 
60%
 
60%
 
72%
 
72%
 
96%
 
96%
 
94%
 
94%
 
52%
 
52%
 
23%
 
23%
 
87%
 
87%
 
93%
 
93%
 
23%
 
23%
 
23%
 
23%
 
39%
 
39%
 
24%
 
24%
 
41%
 
41%
 
11%
 
11%
 
45%
 
45%
 
51%
 
51%
 
35%
 
35%
 
49%
 
49%
 
47%
 
47%
 
37%
 
37%
 
22%
 
22%
 
73%
 
73%
 
39%
 
39%
 
34%
 
34%
 
42%
 
42%
 
45%
 
45%
 
83%
 
83%
 
35%
 
35%
 
44%
 
44%
 
80%
 
80%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.