Saudi Aramco

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
48%
Organisation Score
43%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Saudi Arabia

Climate Lobbying Overview: Saudi Aramco appears to have negative, but limited, engagement with climate change policy. Although the company has supported Saudi Arabia’s participation in the Paris Agreement, it does not appear to accept the need to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions in line with IPCC guidance and has advocated for the continued role of fossil fuels in the future energy mix.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Saudi Aramco appears to prioritize economic concerns over IPCC-demanded emissions reductions in its top-line messaging. Speaking at the 2019 Oil and Money conference, Saudi Aramco CEO Amin H. Nasser stated that “there can also be no question that climate change is among the most significant challenges facing humanity.” In 2021, Saudi Aramco also appeared to accept the need for greenhouse gas emissions to be ‘curtailed’. However, it stated that climate change is part of the ‘duel challenge’ along with meeting the world energy needs in an affordable manner while supporting net zero emissions ‘this century’. In a 2020 CNN article, Saudi Aramco repeated this stance, again highlighting the need to meet the worlds growing energy demand, stating climate change solutions must take in to account the need to maintain affordable energy supplies. However, on its corporate website, Saudi Aramco did state that it supports the Saudi government’s efforts to achieve its contributions as a signatory of the Paris Agreement.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Saudi Aramco does not appear to directly disclose its positions towards, or engagement with, any climate-related policy in its corporate reporting, and does not provide a dedicated disclosure on its climate positioning or lobbying.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Saudi Aramco appears to support the continued role of fossil fuels in the future energy mix. In its 2019 Annual Report, the company states it “believes that, for the foreseeable future, hydrocarbon-based energy will remain indispensable”. In 2021, on its corporate website, Saudi Aramco stated that it does accept that a transition to a low carbon future will occur. However, it’s corporate website also stated that renewables cannot do it alone and also argued that due to rising population, all sources of energy will be needed. CEO Amin H. Nasser echoes these views in his 2019 Oil and Money conference speech, and argues that research and development should not just focus on emerging energy sources, but should also be extended to existing energy sources, adding that, “Without a doubt, oil and gas will be here for many decades to come”. In 2017, Nasser stated that he supported the phase out of coal, but that gas production should be ramped up to replace coal, while stressing the environmental benefits of natural gas.

Industry Association Governance: Saudi Aramco lacks a clearly identifiable disclosure of memberships held with industry associations and has not published an industry association review. Nevertheless, a subsidiary of Saudi Aramco (Motiva Enterprises) is a member of American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM) as well as the American Petroleum Institute (API). Both of these industry associations have lobbied negatively on climate-related regulations and the energy transition.

Additional Note: The Saudi Arabian government owns 98% of Saudi Aramco. It is likely that Saudi Aramco retains channels of direct and private engagement with Saudi Arabian officials that InfluenceMap is unable to assess. As this is not publicly available information, it is not reflected in Saudi Aramco's engagement intensity metric.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
NS NS NS NS NS 1 NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 -1 NA NS -1 0 NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
NS NS NS NS NS 0 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 NS NS NS 1 NS NS
Transparency on Legislation
-2 NA NS NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
1 NA NS NS NS NS NS
Renewable Energy
1 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
-1 -1 NS NS -1 -1 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Disclosure on Relationships
-2 NS NS NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
25%
 
25%
 
51%
 
51%
 
49%
 
49%
 
64%
 
64%
 
23%
 
23%
 
57%
 
57%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.