Rolls-Royce

InfluenceMap Score
C-
Performance Band
57%
Organisation Score
53%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Industrials
Head​quarters:
London, United Kingdom

Climate Lobbying Overview: Rolls-Royce appears to have mixed engagement with climate-related regulation and policy related to the energy mix in 2018-20, despite top-line statements of support for action on climate change. Rolls-Royce appears to have limited disclosure on other forms of climate-related regulations in 2018-20.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Rolls-Royce in 2020 has communicated support for the Paris Agreement and its efforts to limit global warming to 1.5°C. An 2020 op-ed, by Rolls Royce CEO Warren East, stated that “there is now no question about where aviation needs to get to - net zero - and a shared recognition of the urgent need to get there as fast as possible”. Furthermore, in 2019, Rolls Royce signed a joint declaration recognizing the urgent need to decarbonize aviation and the wider economy by 2050, while ensuring the “competitiveness of the European aviation sector”. However, Rolls-Royce has taken no clear position on the need for government regulation to respond to climate change.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: In 2018-20 Rolls-Royce appears to have had limited engagement with climate change policy. Rolls-Royce does not appear to transparently disclose its engagement with specific climate-related regulations, and the company did not clearly describe its positioning on any climate policies in its 2020 “Position on Climate Change” statement. A 2020 consultation submission by Rolls-Royce to the EU states support for an EU blending mandate for sustainable aviation fuels.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In communications from 2018-20, Rolls-Royce has consistently stated general support for the electrification of aviation. In 2019, the director of Rolls-Royce Electrical argued that “electrification is set to have as dramatic an impact on aviation as the replacement of piston engines by gas turbines”. Evidence from 2020 further suggests that Rolls-Royce actively lobbied the UK government to promote the use of small modular reactors for nuclear power in the UK energy mix. In a 2020 joint letter Rolls-Royce urged ICAO to find broad agreement on policies and tools to encourage the use of sustainable aviation fuels. However, Rolls-Royce has also in 2019 communicated in favor of the increased use, and a long-term role for, liquid natural gas in shipping.

Industry Association Governance: Rolls-Royce discloses a limited number of its industry association memberships on its website, without providing further detail regarding its engagement with, or the positions of, such organizations. Rolls-Royce did not respond to the 2020 CDP disclosure and has not published a review of its alignment with its industry associations. Rolls-Royce is a member of the Confederation of British Industry, which has broadly positive engagement with UK climate policy, and the European Roundtable of Industrialists, which has lobbied EU climate policy with mixed and increasingly positive engagement.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Communication of Climate Science
2 NS NS NS 1 NS NS NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 1 NA NS 1 1 NS NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Support of UN Climate Process
NS 2 NS NS 2 NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
-1 NA -2 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
0 NS NS NS -1 NS NS NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy
NS NS NS 1 1 NS NS NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
0 0 NS NS 0 1 NS NA
GHG Emission Regulation
NS NS NS NS 1 NS NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS -2 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
52%
 
52%
 
73%
 
73%
 
50%
 
50%
 
38%
 
38%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.