Groupe PSA

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
50%
Organisation Score
41%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Paris, France
Brands and Associated Companies
Peugeot, Citroen, Opel, Vauxhall

PSA Groupe is engaging with European climate policy and appears predominantly unsupportive of stringent regulatory intervention. PSA Groupe supported COP21 in 2015 and has affirmed it’s continuing support for Paris in its 2019 Corporate Social Responsibility Report, released in 2020. However, the company appears to be less supportive of the need for climate change regulation and has repeatedly stressed its preference for market-based solutions to climate change in its CSR reports. For example, in its latest CSR report PSA Groupe has stated in 2020 that it was “convinced that ignoring market forces, e.g. by banning particular technologies without or even against scientific bases will prove to be counter-productive both in terms of societal acceptance and climate protection progress.” This reflects previous comments from Groupe PSA CEO Carlos Tavares who in a February 2018 interview in Forbes, warned against "overly heavy and prescriptive climate regulation in the EU".

In general, Groupe PSA is not transparent on its positions on climate policy. However, the company and it’s CEO Carlos Tavares has been vocal on a number of policies that directly affect the automotive sector including CO2 standards for vehicles and measures to support the electrification of transport. In 2018, PSA CEO Carlos Tavares argued that the European Commission's proposed 2030 CO2 target of 30% put the "competitiveness of the European auto industry at risk" and publically called for European policymakers to suspended EU CO2 standard penalties if certain targets for electric vehicle infrastructure are not met.

Since then, however, PSA Group appears to have focused its advocacy towards alternative policy measures to support automakers transition towards low-carbon options in the EU. For example, the company has to advocated in 2020 for vehicle taxation schemes to incentivise low carbon vehicles in it’s latest CSR report, despite also stressing that any such tax should be “non-discriminatory and technology-neutral in nature.”

PSA CEO Carlos Tavares was the president of ACEA (European Automobile Manufacturers Association) until December 2019. ACEA has actively opposed various strands of EU climate regulation for the automotive sector, including lobbying for weaker LDV and HDV CO2 tailpipe regulation up to 2018 and, in 2020, advocating for a delay in implementation to of the standards in response to COVID-19. Groupe PSA currently participates in ACEA’s Environmental ELV steering committees.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
1 NS NA NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
0 1 NA NS NS 0 NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation
-1 NS NS NS NS -1 NS NA
UN Treaty Support
1 2 NS NS NS NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -2 NA NA NA NS NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
1 NS 0 NS 1 1 NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
0 NS -1 NS 1 0 -1 NA
GHG Emission Standards
0 NS 0 NS -1 -1 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
40%
 
40%
 
39%
 
39%
 
43%
 
43%
 
33%
 
33%
 
51%
 
51%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.