Nissan

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
57%
Organisation Score
42%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Yokohama, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies
Infiniti, NISMO, Datsun
Wikipedia:

Nissan has a mixed engagement with climate and energy policy. President & CEO Hiroto Saikawa stated in 2018 that the company aspired to lead the way towards a “zero-emission” society. This followed on from a comment by then CEO Carlos Ghosn in December 2016 that combating climate change was “the key mission” of his generation. However, the company does not appear to be fully supportive of ambitious climate policy. For example, in the US between 2018-2019 Nissan has supported weakening vehicle fuel economy and GHG emission standards although not to the extent of freezing them as proposed by the Trump Administration. In 2019, the companies’ Irish subsidiary appears to have came out against a proposed carbon tax, suggesting an alternative policy based on banning the import of used cars. Despite this, Nissan has more engaged on policies associated specifically with incentivising the take up of zero-emission vehicles, including calling on governments in South-East Asia and Oceania in 2018 to create a better environment for customers to switch to electric vehicles. Nissan retains memberships to trade associations in Japan that are actively opposed to climate policy including Keidanren and the Japan Electrical Manufacturers Association. The company is also a member of Global Automakers in the US that has pushed for weaker climate standards for vehicles. Nissan President & CEO Hiroto Saikawa is a Vice-Chairman of the Japanese Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA), which has lobbied against policy including a Japanese carbon tax and ambitious EU Light Vehicle CO2 regulations but has supported subsidies and tax reliefs for low-emission and electric vehicles.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
0 NS NA NS NS 1 NA NA
Climate Science Stance
0 1 NA NS NS 0 NA NA
Need for Climate Regulation
2 NS NS NS 1 -1 NA NA
UN Treaty Support
0 1 NA NS 1 0 NA NA
Transparency on Legislation
-2 NA -2 NA NA NA NA NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS 0 NS NA NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NA NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
NS -1 NS 0 -1 0 NA NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
NS NS 2 NS NS NS NA NA
Energy Policy and Mix
0 2 1 1 0 1 NA NA
GHG Emission Standards
0 -1 NS 0 0 0 NA NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-2 NS -2 NA NA NA NA NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
39%
 
39%
 
38%
 
38%
 
36%
 
36%
 
25%
 
25%
 
36%
 
36%
 
47%
 
47%
 
72%
 
72%
 
51%
 
51%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.