Nissan

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
56%
Organisation Score
46%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Yokohama, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies
Infiniti, NISMO, Datsun
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Nissan seems to take mixed positions on a number of climate policy strands. The company seems to have advocated consistently for the electrification of transport in particular, but also appears to have strongly opposed GHG and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for conventional (ICE) vehicles in the US and EU. In addition, the company retains memberships to a number of obstructive trade associations including the Japan Business Federation (Keidanren).

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Nissan appears to generally support efforts to reduce emissions on the company’s website and in its 2020 Sustainability Report, but it is unclear the extent to which the company supports emissions reductions in line with the recommendations of the IPCC. Nissan has supported the Paris Agreement on its corporate website.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: In the United States Nissan appears to have supported rollbacks in federal GHG and CAFE standards for vehicles. The company's 2018 submission to the EPA consultation on the standards indicated that Nissan did not seem to support Obama-era CAFE standards. In June 2019, the company was part of a group of automakers that wrote to President Donald Trump to advocate against the freezing of federal CAFE standards, but instead advocated for standards that were weaker than those set under the Obama Administration. In October 2019, the company intervened as part of a coalition of automakers in a legal case to support the removal of California's ability to set its own stricter GHG emissions standards under the state’s Clean Air Act waiver. As of February 2021, Nissan has withdrawn from this litigation. Evidence also suggests that the company argued for weaker CO2 standards in Australia in a 2017 consultation response and that the company argued for weaker CO2 targets for light duty vehicles in the EU in 2016.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Nissan has stated its support for the decarbonization of transport in its 2020 Sustainability Report, and the company seemed to place particular emphasis on the role of hydrogen within this transition. In a January 2018 position paper the company called on governments in South East Asia to implement policies to support the electrification of transport and, in its 2020 CDP response, the company detailed how it has engaged with EU policymakers to support the implementation of the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive to support electrification. In addition, in its comments to the EPA on proposals to freeze CAFE standards, Nissan seemed to advocate for expanded consumer incentives for electric vehicles. The company also appeared to support subsidies to accelerate the electrification of transport in Australia in a 2021 media comment and in August 2019 also supported efforts to electrify transport in South Africa.

Industry Association Governance: Nissan does not appear to provide a disclosure of its trade association memberships on its website or through its 2020 CDP disclosure. The company has not completed an audit of its trade association memberships. Nissan is a member of a number of obstructive trade associations including the Japanese Automobile Manufacturers Association, where Nissan executive Uchida Makoto is Vice President, Japan Business Federation (Keidanren), Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) and Global Automakers.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NA NS NS NS NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 1 NA NS 1 0 NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
0 NS NS NS 1 -1 NA
Support of UN Climate Process
0 1 NA NS 1 1 NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -1 NA NA NA NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS -1 NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS -1 NS 0 -1 0 NA
Renewable Energy
NS NS 2 NS NS NS NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 2 1 2 1 1 NA
GHG Emission Regulation
0 -1 NS 0 0 1 NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-2 NS -2 NA NA NA NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
43%
 
43%
 
38%
 
38%
 
36%
 
36%
 
33%
 
33%
 
47%
 
47%
 
72%
 
72%
 
49%
 
49%
 
73%
 
73%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.