Holcim

InfluenceMap Score
C-
Performance Band
61%
Organisation Score
52%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Jona, Switzerland
Brands and Associated Companies
Cement Australia, Aggregates UK, ACC Ltd, Ambuja Cement
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Holcim (previously LafargeHolcim) appears to be actively engaged with climate policy, taking a mixed position on several key policy strands having become more positive over recent years since 2018. The company’s top-line messaging on broad climate change policy appears positive, but takes a more nuanced stance on some key policies relating to the construction sector such as energy efficiency legislation for the construction sector.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Holcim in its 2020 corporate reporting appears supportive of the European Green Deal and the goal of becoming climate neutral in Europe by 2050 through legislation such as the European Climate Law. The company seems to support limiting warming to 1.5°C, in a statement from companies in the Science-Based Targets Initiative in 2020. The company has consistently stated support for policy to respond to climate change, actively advocating in 2020 for the US government to introduce “ambitious, durable, bipartisan climate policy”. Holcim also supports carbon pricing to reduce GHG emissions, but in 2020, in response to the European Climate Law, it suggested the carbon cost should be shifted onto the consumer, not levied on corporations. The company has not explicitly stated support for the UN Climate Treaty in corporate reporting in recent years, appearing to only comment on the five year anniversary of the treaty in a press release in 2020.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Holcim appears generally supportive of an ambitious European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS). In a 2020 earnings call with investors, CEO Jan Jenisch advocated for a higher carbon price to stimulate innovation. In 2020, the company also stated support for a carbon tax at consumption level in response to the EU public consultation on the carbon border adjustment mechanism. In feedback on the carbon border adjustment mechanism roadmap in 2020, Holcim appeared to support the tool alongside existing free allowances in the EU ETS for sectors at risk of carbon leakage, however advocating for a hybrid system whereby companies exporting into the EU would receive a comparable share of free allowances and pay a border tax for any extra emissions. The company suggested in this feedback that the free emissions allowances could potentially be phased out gradually over time.

Holcim appears broadly supportive of energy efficiency standards in the construction sector, but in its 2019 Annual Report stated that legislation must be focused on overall building energy performance and must be material-neutral and based on lifecycle performance. In 2020, the company tweeted support for the EU’s Renovation Wave initiative and also advocated for stricter building performance codes in other European countries in an Earnings call with investors.

Positioning on Energy Transition: The company appears supportive of the low-carbon transition and in 2020 stated that industry “requires abundant and competitively priced renewable energy”. In an article published in Politico in 2020, the company advocated for climate neutral construction and the transition of the manufacturing sector. However, in 2021 Holcim did not appear to be supportive of French legislation, the RE2020, which encourages the use of “biomaterials” in the construction of new buildings, stating support for low-carbon concrete instead.

Industry Association Governance: In 2020, Holcim publicly disclosed a list of some of its membership of trade associations in a document titled ‘LafargeHolcim advocacy, Frequently Asked Questions’, but did not describe the climate policy positions of the associations nor how the company influences them. This list does not include the company’s membership of several influential organizations such as the American Petroleum Institute which negatively lobbies on climate policy. The company has also disclosed a review of its alignment with some of its industry associations on climate change.

A detailed assessment of the company's industry association review can be found on our CA100+ webpage here.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 2 NA NS 1 NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
2 2 NA 0 2 1 NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
1 1 NS 0 1 1 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NA NS 2 1 NS
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA 1 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
1 0 0 0 0 NS NS
Emissions Trading
1 1 -1 0 -1 1 NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 2 -1 0 1 2 NS
Renewable Energy
NS NS NS 0 NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 1 NS 1 0 1 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
-1 1 NS -2 NS 1 -1
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS 1 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
53%
 
53%
 
38%
 
38%
 
57%
 
57%
 
56%
 
56%
 
55%
 
55%
 
68%
 
68%
 
61%
 
61%
 
67%
 
67%
 
23%
 
23%
 
52%
 
52%
 
42%
 
42%
 
74%
 
74%
 
42%
 
42%
 
45%
 
45%
 
34%
 
34%
 
36%
 
36%
 
40%
 
40%
 
64%
 
64%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.