Honda Motor

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
59%
Organisation Score
47%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Tokyo, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies
Accord, Honda Aircraft Company, Civic, CR-V
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Honda is engaging with climate regulations in the USA, Japan, and the UK with mixed positions in 2019-21. While the company has supported some policies to facilitate the decarbonization of road transportation, Honda has also strongly opposed legislation that explicitly favored Battery Electric vehicles (BEVs) over hybrid vehicles, although recent evidence from 2021 suggests an evolving position. The company is also a member of numerous obstructive trade associations.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Honda appears to support emissions reductions, describing itself as “firmly committed to mitigating climate change impacts” in its 2019 North America Environmental Report, published in 2020. In April 2021, Honda’s CEO appeared to support Japan becoming carbon neutral in 2050 as a “feasible target”. Honda supports the targets laid out in the Paris Agreement to keep the temperature rise below 1.5ºC as stated in its 2021 Sustainability Report. although the company does shape its messaging on emissions reductions around support for the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Honda has consistently engaged with US policymakers on regulations to decarbonize road transport. In an October 2018 submission to the EPA, the company supported maintaining Obama-era Federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and GHG standards. However, Honda formed part of a group of companies that wrote a letter to President Donald Trump in June 2019, advocating against freezing federal CAFE standards, and instead supported proposed standards weaker than those set under the Obama Administration. In July 2019 Honda entered into a voluntary compromise arrangement with California regulators that accepts the state's tailpipe standards and zero-emission vehicle mandates. Honda also stated broad support for carbon pricing in the form of a carbon tax or emissions trading scheme in the United States in its 2019 North American Environmental Report. In April 2021 Honda’s CEO, Toshihiro Mibe, appeared to endorse Japan’s raised 2030 46% economy-wide GHG emissions reduction target as “feasible” while emphasizing it would be “extremely difficult”.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Honda appears to support a low carbon transition for road transport, stating its general support for policy to facilitate the decarbonization of transport fuels and to support electric vehicles in its 2019 North American Environmental Report. However, while the company has supported measures to incentivize low emissions vehicles (including battery-electric, hybrid, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles), for example in its October 2018 submission to the EPA on the CAFE rules, the company seems to sometimes focus on securing a continued role for hybrid vehicles at the expense of BEVs. Honda appears to reject other forms of regulation that directly incentivize BEVs over hybrid vehicles, opposing zero-emissions vehicles mandates in California in 2020 and in Colorado in 2018. Similarly, in the UK, a 2020 consultation response from Honda seemed to oppose the UK’s plan to phase out ICE and hybrid vehicles by 2035 as “too narrow”. In the UK, it also was one of a group of companies that sponsored a 2020 report "Decarbonising Road Transport: There Is No Silver Bullet", which appeared to make numerous assertions about EV lifecycle emissions that have been criticized as exaggerated by experts. Additionally, an April 2021 UK consultation response from Honda Motor Europe also stated support for a later 2035 phase out date for hybrids in the UK, and emphasized the need for "technology neutral" policies to promote hybrid vehicles over battery electric vehicles alone. In the same consultation response Honda appeared supportive of policies and incentives to promote EVs, including a plug-in grant, alongside policies to promote the use of e-fuels over a focus on EVs.

However, while former Honda CEO, Takahiro Hachigo, said in March 2020 that the company would prioritize hybrids over EVs, communications from Honda US in June 2021 suggests evolving support for the wider electrification of transportation. In July 2021, Honda’s CEO also suggested that its electrification plan could be accelerated in response to the proposed EU ICE vehicle ban by 2035, stating that the company must comply with the growing international trend. Furthermore, in August 2021 media comments from Honda in Newsweek appeared supportive of policies promoting the electrification of US transportation. At the Japanese ministerial committee on 2030 mobility held by METI in December 2020, Honda also appeared to be generally supportive of electrification of transportation.

Industry Association Governance: Honda does not have a dedicated, centralized disclosure of its membership of and engagement with industry associations. Rather, each geographic segment of business reports individually through annual Environment Reports, with differing degrees of accessibility, consistency, and detail in terms of the information disclosed. The company is a member of several obstructive trade associations, including the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM), the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) and the Japan Business Federation (Keidanren). Honda Chairman and Director Toshiaki Mikoshiba is a vice chairman of Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA), Honda’s North America’s Executive Vice President Rick Schostek is on the board of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) and President of Honda Europe Katsuhisa Okuda is on the board of European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA). The company has not completed an audit of a potential misalignment with its trade associations on climate policy.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NS NS 2 NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 0 NA -2 2 1 NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
NS 1 NS NS 1 NS NS
Support of UN Climate Process
2 1 NA 1 NS NS NS
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -2 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Emissions Trading
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 -1 NS 1 0 -1 NS
Renewable Energy
0 2 1 NS 2 NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
0 0 NS 0 0 1 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
0 0 NS 1 1 NS NS
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS -2 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
54%
 
54%
 
27%
 
27%
 
33%
 
33%
 
38%
 
38%
 
48%
 
48%
 
43%
 
43%
 
93%
 
93%
 
36%
 
36%
 
47%
 
47%
 
39%
 
39%
 
49%
 
49%
 
55%
 
55%
 
73%
 
73%
 
45%
 
45%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.