HeidelbergCement

InfluenceMap Score
E+
Performance Band
34%
Organisation Score
42%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Heidelberg, Germany

HeidelbergCement appears to have a mainly negative engagement with climate change policy. On its website, HeidelbergCement has recognized the need to take action on climate change and it has joined a industry Initiative to encourage the development of low carbon technologies. However, presentations from the group’s EU policy advisor Rob van Meer and messaging through the company’s 2013/2014 sustainability report have stressed the ‘irreducible’ nature of CO2 emissions in the cement industry, as well as the need to safeguard industry competitiveness in any response to climate change. Further the Group’s CEO Dr. Bernd Sheifele appears to have suggested that HeidelbergCement will avoid ambitious climate regulations, having promoted the cement industry in a presentation to industry representative in 2012 for its “low exposure to energy and emission regulations.” Between 2013 and 2014, the company's EU policy advisor, Rob van der Meer, made presentations to the EU policy think-tank CEPS (Centre For European Studies), stressing the threat of carbon leakage and opposing reforms to the EU ETS. More directly, the company has repeatedly consulted with the European Commission in 2014 and 2015 over EU ETS reform, stressing industry competitiveness and the ‘irreducible’ nature of cement emissions and opposing reforms to increase the effectiveness of the EU ETS. More directly, the company has consulted and given feedback to the European Commission in 2014 and 2015 over ETS reform and opposed reforms such as the Cross Sectoral Correction Factor reform and the Market Stability Reserve. In its consultations, HeidelbergCement has also pressed for the continued allocation of free emission permits for the cement sector and, correspondingly has informed its investors that, whilst it expects some tightening of EU ETS rules, the company will likely still be exempt from more stringent regulation of permit allocation from 2020 onward. The company also used consultations to suggests that they do not support specific energy efficiency targets related to EU energy efficiency directive and emission reduction targets related to the EU Industrial Emissions Directive. HeidelbergCement does seem to have called upon EU policy makers to support renewable energy targets and messaging by HeidelbergCement representatives in the run-up to COP21 supported action on energy transition, encouraging the industry not to fall back to a reliance to fossil fuels just because of the current slump in prices. Despite this, however, the company’s 2015 annual report suggests that the company benefited from declining coal prices and used them as a change to invest in coal, explaining that the lowering prices compensated the increasing regulatory cost components. In its 2015 CDP response, Heidelberg has disclosed that its representatives are “actively steering the internal discussions for developing CEMBUREAU’s position on EU environmental and climate policy.” Furthermore, HeidelbergCement's recent consultation feedback on the EU ETS revision is almost word-for-word identical with that of CEMBUREAU, both actively opposing reforms to the EU ETS and advocating for the ongoing allocation of free permits for the cement sector, suggesting closely aligned interests.

QUESTIONS
SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
0 1 NA NS 1 NS NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation
NS NS NS -1 0 NS NS NA
UN Treaty Support
1 0 NS NS NS NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA 0 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS -2 NS NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
0 -1 -1 -1 0 -1 -1 NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
0 NS 1 -2 NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
0 NS -1 -1 NS NS NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
-2 1 NS NS 1 -1 -1 NA
GHG Emission Standards
1 NS NS -2 NS 0 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Climate Lobbying Governance
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
38%
 
38%
 
28%
 
28%
 
55%
 
55%
 
55%
 
55%
 
37%
 
37%
 
39%
 
39%
 
36%
 
36%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.