Glencore International

InfluenceMap Score
E
Performance Band
31%
Organisation Score
33%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Baar, Switzerland
Brands and Associated Companies
globalCOAL, Xstrata
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Glencore appears unsupportive immediate action on climate change and is negatively engaged via a network of trade associations on several strands of climate change policy. In February 2019, Glencore released an updated Climate Change policy position, in which the company stated support for limiting warming in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement. However, Glencore continues to communicate its position on climate with conditions such as stressing the need to achieve emission reductions according to what it labels a “technology-neutral” and “least-cost pathway.” This framing appears to be used by the company to support pathways that rely heavily on the successful scaling of technologies such as CCS rather than more immediate efforts to cut GHG emissions. In particular, Glencore promotes the role coal in the global energy mix, maintaining in its 2019 reporting that it will be a “key input” over the long term in South-East Asia and promoting it as “part of the energy solution” in a 2020 presentation at a conference on the Swiss Energy Strategy. This follows 2019 revelations regarding Glencore’s funding of a secret multi-million-dollar communications campaign aimed at shifting public and government attitudes in Australia towards coal between 2017 and early 2019. Glencore reportedly held meetings with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison later in 2019 to further promote coal energy technologies. At the same time, Glencore does not appear to support a strengthening in Australian climate policy, which is currently incompatible with the goals of the Paris Agreement. In 2018, Glencore advocated for weakening the Safeguard Mechanism, a policy designed to limit increased GHG emissions from heavy emitters, pushing for greater flexibility in setting GHG baselines along with the use of offsets. In 2019, Glencore further stated support for the Mineral Council Australia ’s position on the policy, which likewise advocated several measures to weaken the policy. Despite Glencore’s 2019 reporting stating that it supports ‘carbon pricing policy’ in principle, in practice, the company has not supported carbon tax legislation in South Africa. In 2016-17 Glencore disclosed that it was directly engaging against the proposed tax, which had been in discussion since 2010 but delayed due to opposition. In 2019, Glencore disclosed that it supported the Minerals Council of South Africa’s position which, in the lead up to the carbon tax bill’s approval in 2019, repeatedly called for further delays to its implementation, raising concerns that it was not accompanied by sufficient incentives, while also demanding very large relief be agreed for the mining sector. Glencore retains strong links to several trade associations actively opposed to meaningful climate change policy, including as a director on the board of the Queensland Resources Council, board-membership of the Minerals Council of Australia and The Minerals Council South Africa, and regular membership of the New South Wales Minerals Council. Glencore’s Industry Association Review, released in 2019, “found no serious misalignment” between its position and the positions of these industry associations.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
2 2 NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
0 1 NA -1 -1 0 NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation
-1 NS NS NS -1 NS NS NA
UN Treaty Support
0 1 NS NS -1 NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -2 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
-1 NS -1 NS -2 0 NS NA
Emissions Trading
0 NS 0 NS -1 NS NS NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
NS NS 0 NS -1 NS NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
-2 -1 NS -2 -1 0 -2 NA
GHG Emission Standards
NS NS NS -1 -1 NS NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS -2 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
50%
 
50%
 
22%
 
22%
 
25%
 
25%
 
52%
 
52%
 
28%
 
28%
 
36%
 
36%
 
21%
 
21%
 
41%
 
41%
 
33%
 
33%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.