ExxonMobil

InfluenceMap Score
D-
Performance Band
42%
Organisation Score
46%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Irving, United States
Brands and Associated Companies
Esso, Mobil, Exxon
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: ExxonMobil appears unsupportive of most forms of climate regulation whilst promoting an energy policy agenda to accelerate fossil fuel development. The company retains an extensive network on memberships to industry associations actively opposing climate-related policy globally.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: ExxonMobil’s disclosures emphasize concerns regarding the desirability or feasibility of urgent action towards a global low-carbon energy transition. In 2020, the organization has disclosed support for the Paris Agreement. Furthermore, in January 2021, Exxon tweeted that it supported "the ambition to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050". However, in its Energy & Carbon Summary from April 2021, Exxon appeared to support limiting temperature increase to 2ºC rather than the more ambitious targte of 1.5ºC. However, in October 2020, CEO Darren Woods has stressed that the energy transition will take a 'long time'.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: While ExxonMobil has communicated support for carbon pricing, it appears this is on the basis that such policies replace a “patchwork of literally thousands of regulations, laws and mandates” currently regulating carbon emissions. This is in contrast to scientific advice from the IPCC which clearly states the need for a range of robust policy interventions to deliver on the Paris Agreement’s goals. The company is a founding member of the Climate Leadership Council (CLC), and in 2020 continues to support the group's carbon dividend plan. This plan, however, comes with a number of caveats, which previously included the rollback of the US Clean Power Plan. In 2020, the CLC carbon dividend plan continues to advocate for 'significant regulatory simplification'.

Despite advocating in late 2019 for the maintenance of methane regulations, ExxonMobil appears to have previously supported a loosening of certain technical detection requirements in the US. In 2020, ExxonMobil proposed its own methane emissions regulation in the US, which are weaker than many of the state-level methane regulations and the EPA's original federal regulation.

Positioning on Energy Transition: ExxonMobil strongly supports the long-term use of oil and gas in the energy mix and makes extensive use of social media advertising to communicate this position. The company has also directly engaged in a range of other policy and legislative items impacting the energy mix, including opposing Colorado Bill SB-181, which would have limited oil and gas development in Colorado in 2019, and donating $1 million to oppose an Alaskan oil tax ballot initiative in 2020. In July 2020, ExxonMobil lobbied to water down the focus on renewable hydrogen in the EU hydrogen strategy to focus instead on hydrogen generated from natural gas. In October 2020, the company has pressed policymakers in Australia for additional financial support for the refinery sector in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Industry Association Governance: ExxonMobil has not disclosed in detail regarding its indirect influence over climate policy via industry associations. Although the company is known to retain memberships of numerous industry associations actively lobby against climate policy (i.e. the American Petroleum Institute, the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers, the Australian Petroleum Production & Exploration Association, the Western States petroleum Association and others), they have not produced dedicated, clearly identifiable disclosure explaining any influence they have on climate policy through these relationships.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
0 -1 NS NS -1 0 0
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 1 NA 2 -1 0 -1
Supporting the Need for Regulations
-1 0 NS -1 0 0 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NA 1 2 1 NS
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -2 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
1 1 NS -2 0 0 -1
Emissions Trading
1 -1 NS -1 1 1 -2
Energy and Resource Efficiency
1 NS NS NS -1 NS NS
Renewable Energy
-1 -1 NS -2 -2 -1 -1
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
-1 -1 NS -1 -1 -1 0
GHG Emission Regulation
1 0 NS 1 0 1 NS
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS -2 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
51%
 
51%
 
40%
 
40%
 
25%
 
25%
 
56%
 
56%
 
42%
 
42%
 
26%
 
26%
 
60%
 
60%
 
53%
 
53%
 
61%
 
61%
 
51%
 
51%
 
60%
 
60%
 
43%
 
43%
 
45%
 
45%
 
62%
 
62%
 
34%
 
34%
 
34%
 
34%
 
34%
 
34%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.