Engie

InfluenceMap Score
C
Performance Band
68%
Organisation Score
62%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Utilities
Head​quarters:
Paris, France
Brands and Associated Companies
GDF SUEZ, International Power , Tractebel Energia, Electrabel
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Engie is actively engaged with several avenues of climate policy in Europe. The company has taken increasingly positive positions on EU climate ambition and appears focused on advocating for the role of 'renewable' and 'low-carbon' gas in the future energy mix.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Engie has made several statements in favour of increased climate ambition between 2018-2020. Despite initially not supporting a ‘net-zero’ GHG target in a consultation with EU policymakers in 2018 (supporting an 80-95% range target instead), Engie has since advocated support for ‘climate-neutral ’or ‘net-zero’ targets; for example, in consultation with policymakers in Europe in 2020 and via an open letter to the UK prime minister in 2019.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Engie has advocated in favor of carbon pricing as a favored mechanism of reducing GHG emissions. In a 2019 position paper, Engie stated support for a carbon price floor for the EU ETS, having previously used a submission to a UK Select Committee to support a UK Carbon Price Floor in 2016. However, when it came to the implementation of a similar policy in France in 2016, Engie reportedly did not support it because it unfairly penalized gas power generation. In 2020, Engie has engaged EU policymakers on the EU ETS, advocating for favorable emission crediting provisions for other gas technologies, including biomethane and renewable and low-carbon hydrogen.

Engie has also communicated support for policy to implement a higher price on carbon to increase solar energy investment. However, this has previously accompanied support for the removal of what it considers ‘overlapping’ policies and regulation. In particular, the company has previously argued against large-scale subsidies to achieve the same aims. Despite this, in 2019, Engie called for France to increase the ambition of its climate plan with regards to both energy efficiency and renewable capacity targets. In 2020, Engie stated support for the EU renewables target of “at least 32%”, particularly supporting mechanisms to promote renewable gas.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Former Engie CEO Isabelle Kocher communicated actively in favour of decarbonizing of the energy mix, as well as for the role for solar energy. However, in its 2019 registration document, Engie appears to support a prolonged role for natural gas over a focus on electrification in France. Engie has directly engaged policymakers in Europe in 2020 advocating for policies to promote ‘green’ and low-carbon hydrogen, as well as other ‘renewable gases’, but also stressing the “essential role” of natural gas in the medium term.

Industry Association Governance: Despite its policy advocacy, Engie retains membership of numerous trade associations, including BusinessEurope, MEDEF, and Eurogas that are actively and negatively engaged on climate regulation in Europe. In its 2019 Universal Registration Document, Engie discloses its “main associations” but fails to provide detail about boards, committees and working groups. The document also does not comprehensively disclose the industry associations’ positions on climate policy or identify areas of misalignment.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
2 1 NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
1 1 NA 0 NS 1 NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation
1 1 NA NS NS 0 NS NA
UN Treaty Support
1 1 NS NS NS 2 1 NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA 0 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
2 2 NS NS -2 1 NS NA
Emissions Trading
1 1 1 0 0 1 1 NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
1 NS NS 0 0 2 1 NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
1 0 0 1 0 0 1 NA
Energy Policy and Mix
1 1 1 0 0 0 0 NA
GHG Emission Standards
NS 1 NS 0 2 2 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
43%
 
43%
 
63%
 
63%
 
39%
 
39%
 
46%
 
46%
 
77%
 
77%
 
93%
 
93%
 
93%
 
93%
 
61%
 
61%
 
41%
 
41%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.