Enbridge

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
53%
Organisation Score
34%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Calgary, Canada
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Enbridge engagement with climate-specific policy shows mixed positions, although the company appears to remain actively engaged with both local and regional energy policies to promote fossil fuels in the energy mix.

Enbridge views climate change as one part of a “dual challenge”, the other being a growing demand for energy. Loosely recommending the pursuit of “multiple pathways” to meet both demands, it does not appear to fully support the IPCC need for drastic action to combat the climate crisis. In regard to climate regulation in general, Enbridge lists support for public policy solutions that are "technology-agnostic, effective and efficient.” The company’s 2018 CDP disclosure lists support for both a carbon tax and cap and trade in Canada. However, in a 2020 sign-on letter with the Business Council of Alberta, Enbridge suggested a freeze on the Canadian Federal Carbon Tax due to the economic stress of the global pandemic.

Enbridge’s position on the energy transition supports an increasing role for natural gas and an ongoing role for coal. In 2019, Enbridge President and CEO Al Monaco discussed the need for instituting clear climate policy at the “higher level” rather than project level in Canada. Emphasizing growing controversy around pipeline construction and the oil and gas industry in general, his statements in 2019 suggest support for policy that would reinvigorate oil and gas production in Canada, including exploitation of the Albertan tar sands. Evidence of Enbridge lobbying in 2020 shows consultations with the Alberta Ministry of Energy, among other Alberta offices, with a focus on increasing the “construction and expansion” of pipelines. Enbridge’s 2018 Sustainability Report highlights intermittency and reliability issues with renewable power in its support for natural gas.

In addition, the company sponsors a news site on its corporate website called Energy Matters. Both Energy Matters and Enbridge’s 2019 corporate twitter emphasize the threat of energy poverty in responding to climate change in order to promote fossil fuels. As of July 2020, the former explicitly supports a sustained role for coal in the energy mix. In 2018 articles on Energy Matters, Enbridge promoted a study that critiqued 100% renewable energy targets as wishful thinking, and opposed measures to electrify the transportation sector.

Enbridge is a member of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers and the American Petroleum Institute, both of which oppose multiple strands of climate change legislation. Its CEO serves on the Executive Committee, Finance Committee, and Board of API, as well as a task force with CAPP.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
1 NS NA NS NS 1 NS NA
Climate Science Stance
0 0 NA NS NS NS NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
UN Treaty Support
1 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
NS NA 0 NA NA NA NS NS
Carbon Tax
1 -1 1 NS NS 1 NS NA
Emissions Trading
1 NS 0 NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
NS NS 0 NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
1 NS 0 NS NS 0 NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
0 -1 NS -1 -2 0 -1 NA
GHG Emission Standards
0 NS 0 NS -2 NS NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS 1 NA NA NA NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
21%
 
21%
 
47%
 
47%
 
29%
 
29%
 
41%
 
41%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.