Eni

InfluenceMap Score
C-
Performance Band
59%
Organisation Score
51%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Rome, Italy
Brands and Associated Companies
AGI, Eni Gas & Power, Polimeri Europa, Saipem
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Eni is actively lobbying EU climate policy in 2018-20 with mixed positions. Eni in 2020 has expressed top-line support for the Paris Agreement and a 2°C global warming target and supported the inclusion of methane emission standards and targets in the EU Green New Deal. However, Eni in 2020 has also continued to vocally support a long-term role for gas in the EU energy mix and an EU ETS that includes free emissions permits for industry as the EU’s central climate policy.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Eni’s top-line communications in 2020 have stated support for the science of the IPCC, the 2°C global warming target, and the Paris Agreement. A 2018 consultation response from Eni on the long-term EU GHG target however appears to be unsupportive of dramatic emission reductions in line with the IPCC’s 1.5°C goal. The company has supported a weaker GHG 2050 EU reduction target, rather than net-zero, emphasizing concerns around industry competitiveness.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Eni has been broadly supportive of the EU ETS in 2020, while appearing to support the free allocation of EU ETS permits for industry. In its 2020 CDP disclosure Eni advocates in support of the “EU-ETS as the central pillar of the European climate policy”, however it appears to support the free allocation of emissions permits for industry. In a 2020 consultation response on the EU ETS revision, Eni stated support for expanding the EU ETS into road and maritime transport and buildings. However, by supporting expanding the EU ETS to road transportation the company does not seem to support vehicle CO2 standards, which the EU ETS would most likely replace. Eni also supported including international carbon credits in the scheme post-2020, which may weaken the scheme’s emissions reduction potential. In 2019, Eni’s CEO Claudio Descalzi further signed the Vatican’s Carbon Pricing Statement, calling for governments to set “economically meaningful” carbon pricing policies, including carbon taxes and emissions trading, but with the caveat that they support economic growth.

Eni’s lobbying on other forms of climate regulation has been broadly positive in 2018-20. In 2020, Eni further appeared to advocate in favor of including methane emission standards and targets under the EU Green Deal. In a 2020 consultation submission, Eni also appeared to promote EU renewable energy rules that would expand the role of biofuels in Europe for heavy-duty, maritime, and aviation transport. Furthermore, in 2018, Eni supported a 550g emissions standards for EU capacity markets to limit the use of highly polluting, and predominantly coal-based, electricity generation.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Although in 2019-20 Eni has communicated support for the decarbonization of the energy mix, it appears focused on promoting the role of gas in the long-term energy mix as a “bridge fuel”, and advocating for a role for gas in the EU’s hydrogen strategy. A 2020 EU consultation response from Eni on the EU’s Hydrogen Strategy further appeared to promote the use of “blue hydrogen” derived from natural gas with CCS. Furthermore, a 2018 report suggested that Eni has lobbied the Italian government to push the country towards becoming a European gas hub, rather than transitioning straight to renewables.

Industry Association Governance: In 2020 Eni published a review of its industry association memberships and their climate-related positioning and engagement. Within this review, Eni stated it is “fully aligned” with 25 of its industry associations regarding their climate-related engagement and “not aligned” with one, the American Fuel & Petroleum Manufacturers, for whom Eni stated they would not renew their membership for in 2020. Eni retains membership to various trade associations in Europe lobbying negatively on climate change policy while promoting the long-term role for oil and gas in the energy mix including the International Association of Oil & Gas Producers, FuelsEurope and BusinessEurope. A senior executive of Eni is also on the board of SolarPower Europe, who are positively lobbying EU climate policy.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Communication of Climate Science
2 1 NA NS 2 NS 2 NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 0 NA 0 2 0 1 NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
0 NS NS NS 1 0 NS NA
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NS NS 1 1 NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA 1 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
0 1 NS -1 1 1 NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS -1 0 0 0 1 NS NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS 0 0 0 -2 -2 NS NA
Renewable Energy
NS -1 NS 0 0 NS 0 NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
0 0 NS -1 0 0 NS NA
GHG Emission Regulation
NS 1 1 0 1 2 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
1 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
43%
 
43%
 
59%
 
59%
 
93%
 
93%
 
52%
 
52%
 
39%
 
39%
 
44%
 
44%
 
35%
 
35%
 
41%
 
41%
 
67%
 
67%
 
42%
 
42%
 
48%
 
48%
 
44%
 
44%
 
73%
 
73%
 
37%
 
37%
 
35%
 
35%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.