Chevron

InfluenceMap Score
E-
Performance Band
22%
Organisation Score
34%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
San Ramon, United States
Brands and Associated Companies
Texaco, Caltex

Chevron appears to be opposing almost all forms of climate-motivated regulation whilst actively pushing a US energy policy agenda that accelerates oil and gas production. Chevron’s 2019 climate policy position states support only for a “market-based” route to “lower-carbon outcomes”, whilst opposing a regulatory approach that establishes GHG emission targets on the use of its products. Between 2015-2018, successive Chevron CEOs have questioned the desirability and feasibility of action on climate in line with the recommendations of the IPCC, for example by suggesting that the challenge of meeting growing energy demand in developing countries should be prioritized over urgent climate policy action. Throughout 2016-2017 former Chevron CEO John Watson also advocated against emissions trading and carbon taxes, suggesting they constitute an unnecessary cost to "the consumer and ... business". In 2018, Chevron appeared to shift from opposing carbon taxes, to suggesting it would support a carbon tax but only with several poorly specified conditions. Despite this, the company still donated $500K to a successful campaign to defeat a carbon tax policy proposal in Washington State in 2018. Chevron has disclosed that it supports the repeal or significant revision of US methane regulations and has directly lobbied the US EPA on the rollback of a number of methane emission measurement requirements in 2018 including, seemingly, through direct meetings with Trump Administration officials. In 2017, Chevron CEO called renewable and low carbon fuel policies in the US and Canada ‘failures’ and in 2015-2018, Chevron has repeatedly lobbied for the repeal of Renewable Fuel Standards at the federal level. Between 2016 and 2018, Chevron directly lobbied US policymakers to open US federal land to oil/gas exploration, demanding that all offshore areas from the lower 48 states and Alaska should be considered for their “hydrocarbon potential”. Chevron is represented on the boards of various trade associations that are opposing climate policy. For example, CEO Michael Wirth is on the board of directors of the American Petroleum Institute which, like Chevron, has lobbied for the rollback on US methane regulation throughout 2017-2018. The company further appears to retain membership to ALEC, a US group renowned for disseminating climate misinformation and for using legal tactics to block a range of US state-level and federal climate polices.

QUESTIONS SOURCES Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency 1 NS NS NS 0 0 1 NA
Climate Science Stance -1 -1 NA NS 0 0 -1 NA
Need for Climate Regulation -1 NS 0 NS 0 0 NS NA
UN Treaty Support 0 NS NS NS 0 -1 -1 NA
Transparency on Legislation 0 NA -2 NA NA NA NA NA
Carbon Tax NS NS NS NS 0 -1 -2 NA
Emissions Trading NS -2 -1 NS 0 0 -1 NA
Energy Efficiency Standards NS NS -2 NS -1 NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation 0 NS -2 -1 -2 -1 NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix -1 -1 NS -1 -2 -1 NS NA
GHG Emission Standards -1 NS -1 -1 -2 -1 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships 0 NS -2 NA NA NA NA NA
Climate Lobbying Governance NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
18%
 
18%
 
36%
 
36%
 
46%
 
46%
 
69%
 
69%
 
28%
 
28%
 
41%
 
41%
 
18%
 
18%
 
26%
 
26%
 
43%
 
43%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.