CRH plc

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
52%
Organisation Score
46%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Dublin, Ireland
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: CRH Plc (CRH) appears to take a mixed approach to climate change policy, becoming more positive since 2018 in its top-line messaging. The company appears not to have articulated clear, public positions on various strands of climate change policy and regulation.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: In 2017, CRH communicated via its financial report concern that the EU's 2050 GHG emission target of 80% represented a constraint on European cement operations. CRH has since communicated support for] limiting warming in line with the Paris Agreement target of 2°C with efforts towards 1.5°C, for example, in 2019 via its 2018 Sustainability Report. The company has also communicated positively on the need for carbon neutrality in the cement sector, although often without placing this goal within a clear timeline. However, in 2020, CRH Chief Executive Albert Manifold publicly advocated for a carbon-neutral cement industry by 2050.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: CRH does not seem to support a shorter-term increase of GHG emissions reductions targets to 50-55% in the EU by 2030, maintaining in the 2019 Annual Report that such reductions would represent "a significant extra constraint on cement operations in Europe". The company appears not to have disclosed a clear position on emissions trading in the EU or in North America in recent years, but in 2018 communicated positively regarding a Canadian cap-and-trade system via CRH Canada's website.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In 2020, CRH Chief Executive Albert Manifold has publicly advocated for a carbon-neutral cement industry by 2050, supporting the Global Cement and Concrete Association's 2050 Climate Ambition. The company does not appear to have publically articulated positions on more short-term policy and regulation to enable this transition. However, a senior executive of a CRH subsidiary, Tarmac, has communicated publically on the need for policy to encourage a shift towards the use of rail freight to support the decarbonisation of the construction industry in the UK.

Industry Association Governance: CRH has disclosed a list of some of its industry associations in its annual report but with no further disclosure of the company's role within those organisations, or the climate policy positions of the associations. The company has not carried out a review of potential misalignments with industry associations of which it is a member. CRH and its subsidiaries are members of several groups which are lobbying negatively on climate policy, such as CEMBUREAU in Europe, and senior executives hold several influential positions in associations such as the National Association of Manufacturers and the Portland Cement Association which are also lobbying negatively on climate policy in the US

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
1 NS NS NS 1 NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
1 1 NA 1 1 0 0 NA
Need for Climate Regulation
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
UN Treaty Support
0 1 NS NS 1 NS 1 NA
Transparency on Legislation
-1 NA -2 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
1 NS -1 0 NS NS 0 NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
1 1 NS NS 1 1 NS NA
GHG Emission Standards
0 NS NS NS NS NS -1 NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
23%
 
23%
 
55%
 
55%
 
35%
 
35%
 
45%
 
45%
 
53%
 
53%
 
74%
 
74%
 
55%
 
55%
 
64%
 
64%
 
36%
 
36%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.