BP

InfluenceMap Score
E+
Performance Band
41%
Organisation Score
38%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
London, United Kingdom
Brands and Associated Companies
Castrol, AMPM, Wild Bean Cafe, Aral
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Improvements in BP’s top line statements on climate change since 2015 appear increasingly disconnected from the companies’ lobbying on a range of climate and energy policy. Responding to the IPCC’s special report on 1.5C warming in October 2018, BP CEO Bob Dudley stated publicly - “Clearly it’s a call to action.” In the same month, however, responding to an an EU consultation, BP appears not to have supported increasing the region’s GHG emission reduction contribution by 2050. In 2016, BP’s Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg and CEO Bob Dudley told shareholders that the company supported "strengthening" climate policy frameworks. However, this does not appear consistent with the company’s support for the US Administration’s rollback of regulations impacting their operations since this time. In 2017, former BP America CEO John Minge sent then US EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt a document with a handwritten note thanking him for his “vision” on regulatory reform. BP also lobbied the US Administration on reducing “regulatory burdens” impacting its operations. In 2018 BP CEO Bob Dudley thanked the Trump administration for the “avalanche of regulations” that have been reduced or removed. BP also actively lobbied the US Administration between 2016-2018 for the repeal or rollback of various methane emission requirements. Bob Dudley has separately explained that the company supports a "carbon price” as it is “by far a better way to go than regulation.” The company’s website states that the company supports either emissions trading or carbon taxes. Despite this, BP spent over $13m in 2018 to oppose carbon pricing regulation in the US state of Washington which would have placed a $15 fee on every ton of CO2 produced. BP has also engaged through multiple channels, including direct consultations with consultations and along with EU trade body FuelsEurope, to weaken the impact of the EU ETS by pushing for greater immunity for industry installations through the allocation of free emission permits. BP’s high-level framing of a global energy transition, promoted through various messaging channels, suggests the need for a “gradual” approach, with increased short-term investment in “advantaged” oil and gas. The company has advocated with both EU and US policymakers for policy to support investment in CCS technologies in 2018. BP’s support for a transition from coal to gas in the power sector is premised on the notion that gas represents a permanent solution rather than a transition fuel. BP has also lobbied for measures to facilitate increased oil and gas development in the US in 2017-2018.

QUESTIONS SOURCES Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency 1 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance 0 NS NA 0 NS 0 NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation 0 0 NS -1 1 0 1 NA
UN Treaty Support 1 1 NS NS 1 0 NS NA
Transparency on Legislation 0 NA NA NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax 0 0 NS -2 0 0 0 NA
Emissions Trading 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 NA
Energy Efficiency Standards NS -1 NS -2 NS 1 NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation NS 0 NS -1 -1 0 NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix 0 0 NS 0 0 0 -1 NA
GHG Emission Standards 0 -2 NS -2 -1 -1 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships -1 NS -2 NA NA NA NS NA
Climate Lobbying Governance NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
17%
 
17%
 
38%
 
38%
 
32%
 
32%
 
45%
 
45%
 
68%
 
68%
 
30%
 
30%
 
40%
 
40%
 
72%
 
72%
 
22%
 
22%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.