Bluescope Steel

InfluenceMap Score
C-
Performance Band
64%
Organisation Score
49%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Melbourne, Australia
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Bluescope Steel appears broadly supportive of action on climate change, although the company's engagement on climate policy has been mixed. Bluescope's engagement with climate policy in Australia has been generally positive, but its lobbying activities in New Zealand have been more obstructive via its subsidiary, New Zealand Steel.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: As of August 2021, Bluescope Steel has consistently acknowledged climate change and supported the Paris Agreement in its corporate reporting. BlueScope’s 2020 Sustainability Report recognized that the global economy “must transition to net-zero by the middle of this century” to limit global warming to “well below” 2°C. This is an improvement from its 2017 position which emphasized the economic and social risks of ambitious GHG emissions reductions. Additionally, Bluescope appears to support public policy such as Australia’s Nationally Determined Contributions and 2030 target to respond to climate change in a consultation submission in 2021. Previously, in its corporate reporting in 2019, the company urged policymakers in Australia to implement policies to meet Paris Agreement targets whilst qualifying this support by stating that regulations should not affect trade competitiveness in Australia and New Zealand.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Bluescopes engagement on climate-related regulations appears to be mixed. Bluescope has consistently backed the National Energy Guarantee in its corporate reporting in 2017-2018, however, without specifying their position on level of GHG emissions targets. In June 2020, it stated support for the proposed expansion of NSW’s Energy Savings Scheme in a submission to the NSW Government. In a 2018 consultation on the AEMC Reliability Frameworks Review, the company supported the reform of self-forecasting provisions to increase the integration of wind and solar power into Australia’s energy grid.

BlueScope’s engagement on climate policy in New Zealand has been less progressive through its subsidiary, New Zealand Steel (NZS). In 2017, NZS appeared to oppose GHG emissions regulation at national or regional level in a submission to the New Zealand Productivity Commission on its 'Low Emissions Economy' consultation. NZS has also consistently lobbied against the strengthening of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme, including an increase in emission pricing in 2018 and a review of emissions baselines in 2020. In 2020, the company has lobbied against the Climate Change Response (Emissions Trading Reform) Amendment Bill that aims to withdraw free emissions allowance.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Bluescope has communicated mixed position on energy transition. In a press release in August 2021, the company appears supportive of the decarbonization of the steel industry. In its corporate reporting in 2018, BlueScope appears generally supportive of the energy transition towards low carbon energy sources such as renewables and battery storage. In a consultation submission in February 2021, it advocated for government policy to help decarbonize hydrogen production and make renewable hydrogen price affordable. On the other hand, the company appears supportive of a long-term of natural gas in energy mix, arguing green hydrogen costs six times higher than natural gas, as reported by Argus Media in March 2021. In an August 2021 consultation response to Victoria’s Gas Substitution Roadmap, the company appeared to not support the transition away from a gaseous based energy system, citing cost concerns of transitioning and the cost of increasing electrification by using renewables, but does support the use of biogas and eventual use of hydrogen. In 2019 the company supported measures to increase the supply of natural gas in Australia, and has previously supported subsidies to keep coal plants open in 2017.

Industry Association Governance: BlueScope is a member of several key industry associations with mixed engagement on climate policy in Australia including Australian Industry Greenhouse Network, Australian Industry Group and Business Council of Australia. BlueScope has a detailed disclosure of its membership and governance processes for industry associations, although it lacks details of its influence within each industry association such as positions held and how the company is attempting to influence policy positions.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NA NS NS 1 1
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 1 NA 0 NS 0 1
Supporting the Need for Regulations
-1 NS NA 0 NS 0 0
Support of UN Climate Process
1 NS NA 1 NS 1 1
Transparency on Legislation
1 NA -2 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Emissions Trading
-2 NS NS -1 NS NS NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS NS NS 2 NS NS NS
Renewable Energy
NS NS NS 2 NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 1 NS 1 0 0 1
GHG Emission Regulation
0 1 NS 1 0 0 0
Disclosure on Relationships
1 NA -2 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
49%
 
49%
 
48%
 
48%
 
40%
 
40%
 
47%
 
47%
 
46%
 
46%
 
60%
 
60%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.