BASF

InfluenceMap Score
D-
Performance Band
46%
Organisation Score
42%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Chemicals
Head​quarters:
Ludwigshafen, Germany
Brands and Associated Companies
Wintershall Holding
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: BASF appears not to be supportive of ambitious climate policy and regulation, advocating for market-based solutions to climate change and tending to focus on its own operations. However, the company seems to have strategic engagement with climate legislation and lobbies negatively on some key policy streams.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: The corporation seems to generally support greenhouse gas emissions reductions and has stated support for the EU’s carbon neutrality goal for 2050, but is predominantly concerned with the company’s own emissions. Furthermore, in 2019 BASF stated support for a goal of carbon neutral growth until 2030, rather than aiming for greenhouse gas emissions reductions in the company’s overall operations. In 2020 BASF emphasized the economic considerations of implementing ambitious GHG emission targets as in the EU, and has stated preference for market-based responses to climate change.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: In 2020, BASF stated opposition to a carbon border adjustment mechanism on the grounds that it would not be sufficient by itself to prevent carbon leakage due to complex value chains for some sectors as well as causing a reduction in competitiveness. BASF stresses the importance of a global carbon pricing mechanism as long as it is market-based and does not penalize energy-intensive industries. In 2020 the company lobbied the EU 2030 Target Plan for increased free allocation of permits on the ETS as well as to promote banking surplus permits. In 2019 the company supported energy efficiency policies as long as they do not affect growth and only if they do not put a limit on energy consumption.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In 2019 BASF generally supported the energy transition, apart from stressing the intermittency of renewable energy sources in 2020 and supporting the use of natural gas, but takes a mixed approach towards renewable energy legislation.

Industry Association Governance: BASF executives have senior leadership roles in a number of trade associations that do not appear to be supporting climate change policies, notably the German Chemical Industry Association and the European Roundtable of Industrialists in which the CEO Martin Brudermüller holds executive positions. The company published an Industry Association Review in 2020 outlining alignment with BASF's climate policies.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency
1 2 NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance
0 0 NA 0 1 0 -1 NA
Need for Climate Regulation
0 0 NA -1 NS 0 NS NA
UN Treaty Support
1 1 NA 0 NS 0 NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
0 NS NS 0 0 -1 NS NA
Emissions Trading
0 -1 -1 -1 0 0 NS NA
Energy Efficiency Standards
0 0 0 0 -1 -1 NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation
0 -1 -1 0 0 0 NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix
0 0 -1 0 -1 0 -1 NA
GHG Emission Standards
NS -1 NS -1 0 -1 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
1 NS -1 NA NA NA NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
47%
 
47%
 
46%
 
46%
 
39%
 
39%
 
39%
 
39%
 
44%
 
44%
 
23%
 
23%
 
47%
 
47%
 
52%
 
52%
 
35%
 
35%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.