ArcelorMittal

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
49%
Organisation Score
44%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Climate Lobbying Overview: ArcelorMittal is lobbying on climate change policy with mixed positions, evolving from primarily obstructive positions since 2015 to become more positively engaged in recent years. The company is highly engaged with climate policy, particularly in the European Union. The company appears generally supportive of top-line initiatives such as long-term emissions reductions, but has consistently lobbied against ambitious reforms to the EU Emissions Trading System.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: The company in 2020 stated support for IPCC demanded emissions reductions to limit warming to well below 2°C and is in favor of policy to respond to climate change, but mostly preferring market-based solutions to government regulation. The company stated support for the EU’s 2030 Climate Target Plan and the European Green Deal in 2020.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: ArcelorMittal has consistently opposed reforms to the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) to increase the effectiveness and the carbon price of the scheme, often stressing carbon leakage concerns and advocating for continued free allowances in 2019. In 2020, senior executives voiced strong support for a carbon border adjustment mechanism in Europe in private consultation with the EU Commissioner Dombrovskis and in its corporate report, ‘Climate Action in Europe’, appearing to view the mechanism as a way to mitigate the company’s concerns about carbon leakage due to the EU ETS. ArcelorMittal has advocated very strongly at the EU level for a carbon border adjustment mechanism and evidence has been found of this in most data sources that InfluenceMap analyzes. However, in response to the EU Climate Law, ArcelorMittal has advocated for the continuation of free allowances in the ETS as well as the implementation of a carbon border adjustment mechanism, which would decrease the effectiveness of the scheme.

In 2020, the company voiced support for renewable energy legislation to “enable the roll-out of low-emissions steelmaking”, in contrast to earlier opposition to such policies in 2015.

Positioning on Energy Transition: ArcelorMittal appears to support the transition of the energy mix towards low-carbon energy. In response to the EU Climate Law in 2020 the company stated its support for carbon neutral steel by 2050, with policy frameworks to support this. The company has frequently advocated for policies to enable industry to access renewable electricity, in 2020 stating support for subsidies for green electricity and hydrogen. On ArcelorMittal’s corporate website it has supported the increased role of natural gas in the energy mix as the world moves away from coal and oil as energy sources because it emits less CO2 when consumed.

Industry Association Governance: ArcelorMittal has leadership positions in multiple organizations negatively lobbying climate policy across the world, including MEDEF, Eurofer and the National Association of Manufacturers in France, the EU and the US respectively. The company in 2020 released a review of its industry association memberships and their alignment with climate policy, finding misalignment with the American Petroleum Institute but not taking further action due to limited influence in the association.

A detailed assessment of the company's industry association review can be found on our CA100+ webpage here.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
2 2 NA 1 2 2 1
Supporting the Need for Regulations
1 1 NS 1 1 1 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NS -1 NS 1 1
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA 1 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
0 1 -1 0 0 1 1
Emissions Trading
-1 -1 -1 0 -1 0 -1
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS -2 NS -2 NS NS NS
Renewable Energy
1 1 NS 1 -2 NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
0 1 NS 1 1 1 0
GHG Emission Regulation
-1 1 NS NS -2 -2 NS
Disclosure on Relationships
1 NS 1 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
38%
 
38%
 
49%
 
49%
 
45%
 
45%
 
52%
 
52%
 
27%
 
27%
 
57%
 
57%
 
42%
 
42%
 
34%
 
34%
 
33%
 
33%
 
43%
 
43%
 
25%
 
25%
 
89%
 
89%
 
49%
 
49%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.