ArcelorMittal

InfluenceMap Score
E
Performance Band
31%
Organisation Score
37%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Luxembourg, Luxembourg

ArcelorMittal is lobbying climate change policy with negative engagement. In its 2016-18 communications ArcelorMittal stresses the economic and technical feasibility of climate regulations over emissions reductions. ArcelorMittal has consistently opposed reforms to the EU emissions trading system to increase the effectiveness and the carbon price of the scheme, often stressing carbon leakage concerns. ArcelorMittal took legal action against the EU ETS in 2017 to receive increased free emissions permits and communications in 2016 in regards to the EU ETS stated that “at a fundamental level it doesn’t work for the steel industry”. In 2017, ArcelorMittal’s CEO stated support for a carbon adjustment border tax for the EU ETS, while criticizing the costs of the scheme. ArcelorMittal further opposes a South African carbon tax, arguing in 2018 that it would be unaffordable and so should be cancelled or delayed. Communications from 2017 further suggest ArcelorMittal is supportive of measures to transition to a low-carbon economy and advocates for the electrification of transportation. ArcelorMittal has leadership positions in multiple organizations negatively lobbying climate policy across the world, including MEDEF, Eurofer and the National Association of Manufacturers in France, the EU and the US respectively.

QUESTIONS SOURCES Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Climate Science Transparency NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Climate Science Stance NS -1 NA -2 NS NS NS NA
Need for Climate Regulation -1 -1 NS -1 -1 -2 NS NA
UN Treaty Support 1 NS NS -1 NS NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation 1 NA 1 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax -2 -1 0 NS -1 NS -1 NA
Emissions Trading 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 0 NS NA
Energy Efficiency Standards NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy Legislation 0 NS NS NS -2 NS NS NA
Energy Policy and Mix 1 -1 NS NS 1 NS NS NA
GHG Emission Standards 0 -1 NS NS -2 -2 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships 1 NS 1 NA NA NA NS NA
Climate Lobbying Governance NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
16%
 
16%
 
44%
 
44%
 
34%
 
34%
 
37%
 
37%
 
32%
 
32%
 
32%
 
32%
 
45%
 
45%
 
26%
 
26%
 
16%
 
16%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.