Apple

InfluenceMap Score
B
Performance Band
87%
Organisation Score
63%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Information Technology
Head​quarters:
Cupertino, United States
Brands and Associated Companies
iphone, ipod, mac, ipad
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Apple appears generally supportive of policy action on climate change. The company demonstrates clear support for renewable energy policy and the energy transition, but appears unengaged with most other forms of climate policy.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Apple has issued general support for ambitious climate action, calling for "fierce urgency" in a 2019 statement, but its top-line communications have been limited, particularly in recent years. Apple has supported the Paris Agreement in the past. In 2020 remarks at the UN Climate Ambition Summit, CEO Tim Cook called on governments globally to implement stronger climate targets in coming years.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Apple appears to lobby on a limited number of specific climate policies, with a clear focus on expanding access to renewables for corporate use. The company continued to oppose efforts to repeal the Clean Power Plan in 2018. That same year, Apple (with Google), submitted a comment to the North Carolina Utilities Commission aimed at improving a green tariff structure proposed by Duke Energy. In the state of Iowa, Apple opposed a 2018 bill that would have undermined energy efficiency initiatives.

Previously, in a 2017 letter advocating for greater use of corporate renewable power purchase agreements, Apple supported raising the EU's renewable energy target from 27% to 35% by 2030. That same year in Japan, Apple joined companies calling for action from the government to make grid rule changes to help companies reach their 100% renewable targets. Recent activity has been limited, with the exception of a 2020 sign-on letter through the European Corporate Leaders Group which urged the EU to increase its emissions reduction target to 55% by 2030.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In general, Apple communicates clear support for a global clean energy transition. In 2020, the company signed a letter to Dominion Energy pushing the utility to invest in renewables and battery storage rather than natural gas expansion. In 2018, it urged the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reject calls from the Department of Energy that would have subsidized coal while making clean energy more expensive. InfluenceMap was unable to locate evidence of engagement with other forms of energy transition policy, such as clean transportation.

Industry Association Governance: Apple is a member of Advanced Energy Economy, which has lobbied positively on all forms of climate policy in the US, and the Japan Climate Leaders Partnership. In 2009, Apple renounced its membership with the US Chamber of Commerce in response to the association’s comments against the US EPA. Conversely, Apple retains its membership with Business Europe and the Japanese Business Federation, two organizations which have consistently opposed ambitious climate action in their respective jurisdictions.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NS NS 2 1 1 NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
2 1 NA 2 1 1 NS NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
1 1 NS NS NS 2 NS NA
Support of UN Climate Process
NS 1 NA NS 2 1 NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA 0 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS NS 1 NS 2 NS NS NA
Renewable Energy
2 2 1 2 2 NS 1 NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 1 1 2 1 2 NS NA
GHG Emission Regulation
NS 2 NS 2 1 NS NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NS 1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
96%
 
96%
 
60%
 
60%
 
41%
 
41%
 
51%
 
51%
 
76%
 
76%
 
77%
 
77%
 
84%
 
84%
 
40%
 
40%
 
71%
 
71%
 
23%
 
23%
 
45%
 
45%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.