Air Liquide

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
45%
Organisation Score
47%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Chemicals
Head​quarters:
Paris, France
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Air Liquide is actively supporting policy to promote the role of hydrogen in the energy mix but has appeared unsupportive of broader regulatory ambition on climate change in Europe.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: The company’s website recognizes IPCC recommendations on the need to make drastic emission reductions by 2050. However, Air Liquide does not appear to have explicitly stated support for Europe’s ‘net-zero’ 2050 climate ambition. In a 2018 consultation on the EU's long-term strategy on climate, Air Liquide indicated a preference for an alternate target of 80-95% emission reductions and also appeared to highlight concerns over competitiveness from non-EU countries not engaging in a low-carbon transition.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Air Liquide has not disclosed a recent position on the EU Emissions Trading System, despite taking positions unsupportive of efforts to raise the carbon price in the past, informed by concerns regarding industrial competitiveness. In its 2019 CDP response, Air Liquide disclosed that it continued to emphasise this point in its advocacy efforts via CEO Benoit Potier’s position within European Roundtable of Industrialists between 2014-2018. In 2020, however, an Air Liquide spokesperson communicated a supportive position regarding the positive impact of an emission trading scheme on the role of the hydrogen sector in China.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Air Liquide has actively promoted a role for hydrogen in the energy mix both globally via the Hydrogen Council initiative, and directly to policymakers at the EU level. However, the company's engagement on this issue, as evidenced in its 2020 feedback to policymakers on the EU Hydrogen Strategy, has stressed the importance of 'blue' hydrogen, relying on natural gas and the development of CCS technologies, to accompany 'green' hydrogen, produced via renewables

Industry Association Governance: Air Liquide retains a number of strong links to organisations that appear not to fully support regulatory intervention on climate change, including BusinessEurope and MEDEF. While the company has reported on some of its industry association links via its CDP disclosure, it has not disclosed a comprehensive public audit of its industry association memberships and alignment on climate change policy.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
2 2 NS NS NS NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 1 NA 1 2 1 NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
0 NS NS NS NS 1 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
0 1 NS NS -1 1 NS
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA -1 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS -1 NS
Emissions Trading
NS -2 -1 0 1 -1 NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 -2 NS NS NS NS NS
Renewable Energy
0 -2 NS NS NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
0 0 0 -1 1 1 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
NS 1 NS NS -1 NS NS
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS 0 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
67%
 
67%
 
27%
 
27%
 
42%
 
42%
 
45%
 
45%
 
60%
 
60%
 
57%
 
57%
 
57%
 
57%
 
48%
 
48%
 
43%
 
43%
 
25%
 
25%
 
49%
 
49%
 
44%
 
44%
 
41%
 
41%
 
44%
 
44%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.