Air France-KLM

InfluenceMap Score
E+
Performance Band
38%
Organisation Score
40%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Airlines and Logistics
Head​quarters:
Paris, France

Climate Lobbying Overview: Air France-KLM is actively engaging with climate regulation and appears broadly unsupportive of regulatory intervention to directly address aviation GHG emissions. The company appears to strongly favor market-based mechanisms over binding regulation on climate change and generally opposes national and regional climate regulations, supporting only global measures at the international level.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Air France-KLM in 2020 has stated that it supports an international sectoral deal on aviation emissions. It has further endorsed the UN International Civil Aviation Organisation position of 'carbon-neutral' growth in the short term and a 50% reduction against a 2005 baseline by 2050 for the sector. It is of note that, according to the IPCC, global net CO2 emissions should reach net zero around 2050 to ensure a 1.5C warming target, with this rising to 2070 for a 2C target. In 2018-20 Air France-KLM has consistently opposed the need for regional and national aviation climate regulations in Europe.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Air France appears to support the global CORSIA offsetting scheme as the “sole vehicle” for global aviation emissions reductions. In March 2019, KLM President & CEO, Pieter Elbers publicly supported ICAO’s CORSIA emissions mitigation scheme under which airlines must buy offsets for emissions beyond an average baseline emissions of 2019, and/or use ‘CORSIA eligible’ fuels (a voluntary scheme until 2027). At the same time, however, the company has opposed other forms of regulation, especially at the national level, arguing through its 2020 public policy positions that participation in CORSIA should exempt the sector from policies including the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS). Air France-KLM disclosed through its 2020 CDP disclosure that it is lobbying EU policymakers to replace the EU ETS with CORSIA for international aviation.

In 2018-20, Air France-KLM has repeatedly lobbied against several taxes aimed at reducing the aviation sector’s climate impact including France’s ticket tax, a national air passenger tax in the Netherlands, and an EU-wide jet fuel tax. Air-France KLM’s CEO, Ben Smith, in 2020 stated that new taxes “do not support emissions reductions” in Europe.

In 2020, Air France-KLM supported a joint strategy, developed through the Clean Skies for Tomorrow initiative, that includes introducing an EU sustainable aviation fuels blending mandate and appears supportive of policies to promote sustainable aviation fuels in France and the Netherlands.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Air France-KLM appears broadly unsupportive of measures to transition away from fossil fuels in the aviation sector, opposing the introduction of any aviation taxes on fossil fuels to promote a low-carbon transition. In 2020, Air France’s CEO, Benjamin Smith, stated that “in view of the coronavirus outbreak, we are asking governments to suspend the introduction of new flight taxes ... All of these taxes are imposed in the name of sustainability but the money is not being earmarked for that. It’s not truthful, it’s deceptive”. However, in 2020, as part of the Clean Skies for Tomorrow initiative, Air-France-KLM appeared to endorse EU-wide policies to ensure the decarbonisation of long-haul aviation.

Industry Association Governance: Air-France-KLM retains board-level membership to IATA, who have actively lobbied against ambitious global climate policy for aviation, and is also a member of BusinessEurope, which have lobbied in opposition to climate policy ambition in Europe. Air France-KLM does not publish a comprehensive list of industry associations memberships and has not disclosed a review of its industry association links to assess alignment with its own climate policy positions.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Communication of Climate Science
1 2 NS NS NS NS 2 NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 0 NA 0 -1 NS NS NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
-1 -1 NS -1 -1 -2 NS NA
Support of UN Climate Process
NS 0 NS NS NS 1 NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
1 NA 1 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS -2 -2 NS NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
-1 NS -2 -1 -1 -1 -2 NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy
0 NS 0 NS 2 NS NS NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
-1 0 -2 -2 0 -2 NS NA
GHG Emission Regulation
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS 0 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
32%
 
32%
 
35%
 
35%
 
39%
 
39%
 
44%
 
44%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.